One-of-a-kind handmade blue paper triangle box by Christine Trexel.

Triangle bow with four handmade boxes within accented with seed pearls pulls by NW paper artist Christine Trexel.

Indeed, blue signifies life-giving air and often signifies hope and courage.

“Spring 2021” encaustic composition art by Peg Wells.

 Wells, a retired nurse, remains consistent with hopeful art emerging from this time of change.

“We’ve all gone inside to reflect and heal, but after this period of isolation, there was always time to create comforting and healing art. Everyone is uneasy, all over the globe, but art can help us process the fear. Art also has the power to transform. Artists let their creativity flow, as a tool for understanding and courage.”

 

 

Aquamarine and turquoise gemstone necklace by jewelry designer Mary Truhler.

 

“Some people think that the blue colors of the gemstones symbolize the sky and sea, and that this means truth, sincerity and inspiration.”

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

“Spring work is going on with joyful enthusiasm.” — John Muir

 

Impasto oil artist Tedd Chilless presented a Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episode during the opening reception of WILD BEAUTY at the November 7th Seaside First Saturday Art Walk at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Artist Leopoldine Brew offered an artist talk about her WILD BEAUTY oil paintings during the opening reception of WILD BEAUTY at the November 7th Seaside First Saturday Art Walk at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

 

 

Emerging artist Vanessa K. Stokes gave an inspiring artist talk about her watercolor, pen and ink original works for the opening reception of WILD BEAUTY at the November 7th Seaside First Saturday Art Walk at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Photo top left:

Landscape art by Lee Munsell, encaustic art Peg Wells, ocean oil by Phil Juttelstad, wave paintings by Sharon Abbott-Furze, woven twig basket by Charles Schweigert, and fused glass art pieces by Monet Rubin.

Photo top right:

Pelican mixed media by Helen Brown, watercolor landscapes by Mary Burgess, fresco paintings by Agnes Field, floral impasto by Tedd Chilless, pen and ink drawings by Vanessa K. Stokes, and fine art photography by Steven A. Bash.

 

Photo bottom left:

Fine art photograph by naturalist Neal Maine, abstract art by Barbara Martin, beeswax paintings by Kathryn Delany, graphite on yupo by Patricia ClarkFinley, landscape oil by Colette Fallon, and pottery by Suzy Holland.

 

Photo bottom right:

Mixed media WILD BEAUTY series by Jan Rimerman, woven twig basket by Charles Schweigert, wood bowls by Daniel Harris and Tom Willing

Photo collages by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

 WILD BEAUTY Exhibition and Art Sale

Through Nov. 24th

Featuring NW artists Leopoldine “LEO” Brew,  Agnes Field, Patricia Clark-Finley, Dorota Haber-Leligh, Ron Nicolaides, Neal Maine, Jan Rimerman, and Vanessa K. Stokes, among others.

The strength of WILD BEAUTY lies in the detailed and multivariate perspectives each artist brings showing us a different viewpoint.

They all use WILD BEAUTY as the theme of their work but they use different techniques and the way they see it is distinctively unique.

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Astrophotograher Bob Kroll with his art on display.

Watercolors by Paul Brent, fall drawings by Dorota Haber-Lehigh, fused glass by Carolyn Myers Lindberg, and encaustic art by Peg Wells.

Mixed media by Elina Zebergs, sunflower abstracts by Jan Rimerman, raw edge wood furniture by Ray Noregaard, and oil paintings by Emily McNeil.

Framed calligraphy quotes by Penelope Culbertson and  photo on metal by Neal Maine, and NCLC gift cards.

Impasto abstracts by Leah Kolenberg, art glass by Fedor Zubanov, watercolors by Bill Baily, and wood bowls by Tom Willing.

Landscape photos by Steven A. Bash, jewelry by Mary Truhler, oils by Sharon Kathleen Johnson, and pottery by Suzy Holland.

Landscape oil by Karen E. Lewis, hammered silver by Nikki Hatt, glass by Bob Lercari, and photographs by Neal Maine.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Seaside, Oregon

Through Sept. 26th 

OVER and UP September Art Exhibition focuses on contemporary art, showcasing a wide variety of art forms, mediums and expressions.

Images by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Gallery visitor recently spotted artist Bev Drew Kindley photographing her HELLO SUNSHINE art on display.

“It was so good meeting you and seeing your beautiful and serene gallery. I thought you would enjoy a picture taken during my visit.” Susan

Last call for HELLO SUNSHINE on exhibit through August 25th.
Collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall

Sharing a few August artist grace notes:

Artists were prepared for the emotional challenges that come with a predominantly remote means for creating work during COVID-19.

“One unforeseen emotional benefit of the pandemic has been the recognition of an innate need for authenticity. The trust we place in each other at these vulnerable moments gives us a better sense of empathy.”  A. Schneider/ August, 2020

“Thank you for the article on following your passion. It was a wonderful read. I agree, more than ever, supporting artists and small businesses are  important. I know you are continuing to have support from visitors and your community.  I’m nearly finished with a piece that works well with your future shows. Coming soon. Best regards. –Diane Copenhaver

“Primordial Bay” abstract by Martha Lee

30″ x 30″

Thank you for your lovely note about my painting “Primordial Bay.” It was so uplifting. I have read it over at least 25 times and will read it every day. How thoughtful of you to reach out to me. I do hope that the planning for ongoing exhibitions is going well.  I  thank you that my paintings will be continued to be welcome in your elegant gallery. I treasure our connection to the arts.”   –Martha  Lee

Fairweather Gallery has been the place for cultural art gatherings, art talks, music events, art education, artist socializing,; indeed, it is a perfect event space to throw that perfect party. First and foremost,  however, it is an art gallery.

Throughout the years, many people have visited the gallery, locals and people from out of town, to enjoy the beautiful surroundings, art, music, wine tastings, listen to an inspiring artist talk, and, oftentimes, to offer a comforting ear about a good works event (Arctic Light/ Beaver Tales/ Ode to the Tides).

And, so, it goes forward, while maintaining balance during a pandemic within the arts community, Fairweather continues to develop a list of best practices following approved guidelines. The Gallery has taken into account a continuing shift moving on …with more steps forward with each passing month in offering after-hours arts events. What is on hold, until there is a containment of the virus is the LIVE music and wine tastings,  thereby keeping everyone safe and healthy.

What remains, and, truly, what is most important, is the art, artists, uplifting stories, and sense of community while observing social distancing practices.

Opening Reception

OVER and UP Exhibition

Sept. 5th, 5-7 p.m.

Featuring Northwest artists Paul Brent, Victoria Brooks, Patricia Clark-Finley, Pam Haunschild, Bob Kroll, Martha Lee, Jan Rimerman, Emily McNeil, Neal Maine, and Peg Wells.

OVER and UP focuses on contemporary art, showcasing a wide variety of art forms, mediums and expressions.

Visiting artists will offer talks.

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

Table display I for HELLO SUNSHINE:

Hand painted transparent metallic luster wood turned candlesticks, hand dipped tapers, silk cording spools,  seed  pearl mosaic box by Gayle H. Seely, hand-dyed silk scarf,  hand-wrapped silk flowers,  glass art by Carolyn Myers Lindberg, hand-woven bamboo runner and encaustic art by Emily Miller.

 

 

 

Meticulous displays, like none other, with disciplined attention to design perspectives. Find harmony in exquisite materials, combined with the spirit of many artists who know how to apply the mark of being in the Northwest.

 

 

Table display II for HELLO SUNSHINE:

 

Hand-made kitchen/bath textile gifts for summer hostesses tied with sunny ribbon, bright hand-dipped candle tapers, hand-cast nickel candlesticks, linen/ cotton hand-hemmed runner, and glittering one-of-a-kind jewelry by Reneé Hafeman.

 

 

 

 

 

Find where interior design is not decorating but rather giving coastal homes the peaceful lifestyle. Find where everyday dreams are integrated with irreplaceable humanity, friendship and beauty.

 

 

 

Table display III for HELLO SUNSHINE:

Hand-made hostess gifts topped with a silk sunflowers, fused glass soap trays by Christine Downs, hand-made beaded ear-rings by Mary Truhler, and hand-carved bone picture frame.

 

 

 

 

 

“Part curatorial, part installation Fairweather brings together artists’ works from a wide variety of genres and mediums, grouping them into an expansive spectrum of theme and color.”

 

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall for HELLO SUNSHINE

 

Gallerist Denise Fairweather draws upon her life experience in design, principally as a senior level project designer/ Allied Member of the American Society of Interior Designers.  She thinks in terms of staging when designing exhibits.

 

 

“I do see staging art as a kind of a set.  When an exhibit is set, complete with the proper lighting, signing and art on display, so to speak, I want to see a perfect scene, for the artists, of course, for the visitors.  The assembled accessories  are placed to complement the art created with a specifically appointed theme … all working together to create a perfect exhibition.”  

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

HELLO SUNSHINE

“The sun is but a morning star.” – Henry David Thoreau

Now on exhibit through August 25th

Art for the exhibition created entirely by North coast artists. Featuring art by Paul Brent, Lieta Gratteri,  Reneé Hafeman,  Bev Drew Kindley, Karen E. Lewis, Carolyn Lindberg, Neal Maine and Fedor Zubanov.

 

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

Q: What goes into the thought process when selecting an exhibition title, you ask?

A:  An exhibition title is selected one year in advance. HELLO SUNSHINE was chosen to herald in the Indian Summer season, at time when the sun, seems to (finally) shine on the North coast lands.

 

Yet, too, as in the August 2020  exhibition, a theme became a metaphor in relation to current events happening; it became a beacon of light, artistically speaking, amidst all the the darkness in the world happening during COVID-19.

 

 

 

Save the date and time

Sept. 5th, 5-7 p.m.

Opening reception

OVER and UP exhibition

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Two artists selected were invited work on the exhibition as a collaborative project; both have a similar vision of rapport and fellowship.

Featuring Bob Knoll and Paul Brent, and more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Splendor of the Sea” encaustic by Peg Wells

10″x10″ $150

“Rocky Shore” encaustic by Peg Wells

17″x14″ $200

Hand made chiseled glass

$95-$295

Glassware by Rox Heath

$20 per piece

SHORE THINGS postcard

Mouth blown hour glass, bronze dragonfly, handmade glass bowls, coral centerpiece, fused glass platter and more.

“The shore: if I’m not on it, near it, or looking at it, I’m dreaming of it.”
Unknown Author

“I hope someday I’ll wake up to see that I live near a shore.”
Unknown Author

“At the shore, life is different. Time doesn’t move hour to hour but mood to moment. We live by the currents and plan by the tides.”
Unknown Author

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

 SHORE THINGS

Art show and sale

On exhibition through July 30th

 Exploring the deep, multifaceted relationship with the sea and shore

    Featuring original art by NW artists Paul Brent, Nick Brakel, Emily Miller, Pam Haunschild, Leah Kohlenberg,  Karen Lewis, Lee Munsell, Ron Nicolaides, Susan Romersa, Vicky Combs-Snider, and Peg Wells

Introducing oil painter Colette Fallon

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to NW artists, and our products made by NW hands

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Copyright © 2020

Grace note received:
“It was wonderful visiting the gallery after your COVID-19  shutdown. Here are some of the pictures of the work I painted at home during the time spent in isolation and just delivered to you.”  Peg Wells

‘Mt. Hood View’  10″ x 15″ encaustic art by Peg Wells

With frame  15″ x 19″ $250

Strike off to show complementing frame detail
I was a Navy wife, mother, critical care nurse and golfer for many years. We lived in many different states and countries.  I spend summers on the Oregon Coast, enjoying family, and live in the Willamette Valley during the winter. My art background has been with clay – hand built, pottery and tile design, until discovering painting with encaustic (bees wax).”   Peg Wells

‘Yellow Flowers for You’ encaustic art by Peg Wells

10″ x 10″ $150

‘Many Flowers for You’ encaustic art by Peg Wells

10″ x 10″ $200

“With a history that stretches back to the hauntingly beautiful portraits of ancient Greece, modern encaustic art is enjoying a renewal of popularity among artists and art lovers alike.  Art collectors are assimilating encaustic art into their collections.  Peg Well’s encaustic works depict a broad range of surface effects and has a luminous translucency that is, truly, unique in innovation and creativity.”   —D. Fairweather, gallerist

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside

Open Mon, Thu, Fri, Sat, and Sun 11-4:pm

Closed Tue and Wed until July

Moving forward our hours will remain limited until there is a convincing containment of the coronavirus.

“Fairweather House and Gallery had a few sales during the recent mandated shutdown. Some galleries pinned their hopes on online sales.  To thrive online we would have to forfeit our main role: our knowledge on a work of art and our capacity to transform an art object into a story. Therefore, the solution to go online was never an option;  we needed to stay mindful about the fact that this was totally contrary to what our business is.

And, too, on-going messages from artists during the 3 month shutdown provided much-needed solace for us. Art lovers will drive future sales for it is really the special artist stories that people are waiting for, in our opinion.

Looking back, previous exhibitions featured more than 100 new works of art.  It was heartwarming to find that moving forward during a partial reopening that artists delivered 76 new works of art  in original oils, watercolors, and other media as well as new pottery and bronzes with everyone following reopening safety guidelines. 

Since reopening in June  we are working much harder for the artists than in normal times. Indeed, the pandemic crisis is a strange situation for everyone all over the world. 

The arts have always helped people to cope in dark times. We are grateful for the artists who used their time in isolation to create, to be more hopeful,  to be even more connected to each other, to reaching out even more to the gallery, sharing their art stories and caring even more deeply for all the citizens of the world.”  –-D. Fairweather, gallerist

Please read more about our gallery and our commitment to NW artists and products made by NW hands.

“Part curatorial, part installation Fairweather House and Gallery brings together artists’ works from a wide variety of genres and grouping them in seasonal spectrums.”

 

Grace notes received

“I read that you have survived the quarantine. It has really been a real test for all of us!! We are coming over and I have some new work. If my husband and I could help in any way we would be more than willing. Best wishes and looking forward to seeing you.” Peg Wells

 

“I hope that everything with the re-opening is going smoothly. I’m selecting new work for you. I will bring the new art in June if that works for you. In addition,  I will have new Plein Air for the gallery that I will do while I’m up there this summer. Thanks so much for what you do. All the best.”  Victoria Brooks

“Hope the re-opening goes as smoothly as possible.

Honestly, I have only been off the property 7 times since March.

Not really comfortable with the opening of the state yet. If we can make an appointment that is safe for everyone, I will drive down with the art that I have for you.

I do want to make everything successful for you and the gallery, so let’s make a plan.” Jan Rimmerman

 

“Hope plans are going well for the gallery.

I have some ideas for display at your gallery. I can get choices to you in June.

I will make an appointment with you to show you some in person.

Thank you for supporting the arts as we all progress through these changing times.”   Susan Romersa

 

 

“Welcome back to this new unsettled world we are living in!  I am glad that your gallery is opening back up, I ‘m sure it’s not been without a lot of new planning and hopefully some joy to be back at it!
Before all of this hit, I was to bring some of my ceramic work and was planning to do so for the June and August shows. 
Please let me know if there is time or space (!) available for me to bring up to 3 pieces and if so, when could I schedule a time to deliver?
My schedule is not as full as it used to be and I would love to make a trip to the beach if that is a possibility!”  Sandy Visse

 

“Just checking in. How are the gallery plans coming for this summer? We have booked a flight to Oregon in June. At any rate we will see you shortly thereafter.  Hopefully things will be open for the usual July Art Walk.”  Paul and LJ.

“Mary and I should be able to make a delivery run to Seaside over the weekend or early next week.

What works for you?  I will have salad bowls and burl show pieces. Mary has paintings.

Let us know when you would like is to show up and we’ll time it right.”  Tom Willing and Mary Burgess

 

It is our hope to continue to bring you informative and regional art notes that provide unique knowledge and inspiration for moving through this extraordinary period of change in our lives. 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery thanks you for your continued support, patience, and assistance as we navigate the ever-changing mandates and requirements.
The more we work together, the faster our community can begin to recover from this crisis.
Strategies that the gallery is implementing to adapt to changes and well being.
These are temporary practices aimed at keeping our community healthy.

Opening Mon, Thu, Fri, Sat, and Sun 12-3:pm

Closed Tue and Wed

Moving forward our hours will remain limited until there is a convincing containment of the coronavirus.

Staying safe.

“The pandemic has made clear the importance of good trauma-informed practices. Art saves. Art helps build resilience and coping skills. Art provides a much needed sense of safety and routine. Art connects with people who might otherwise be isolated and overwhelmed.”

 

Please read more about our gallery and our commitment to NW artists and products made by NW hands.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Handmade ceramic beads, mouth blown glass and semi-precious gemstone necklaces and earrings by jewelry artist Mary Truhler.

Spring Day  Approaching encaustic art by Peg Wells.

Q: What do the three Fairweather artists have in common, you ask?

A: The artists  Mary Truhler and Peg Wells have a nursing background.  Some of the fundamental values that drive art — compassion, humanity, empathy, creativity and expression — are the very same values that influence nursing. The creation of art is a wonderful vehicle for nurses, whether the goal is to unwind, replenish the soul or share the nursing experience with the world. Proof that nursing and creative mindsets can live harmoniously.

Case studies of the scientific  mind engaging in art and vice versa are often presented as being unusual. However, psychologists recently conducted a comprehensive review of the extent to which Nobel Prize winners in the sciences, members of the Royal Society and US National Academy of Sciences, and members of the US public reported engaging in arts and crafts-based pursuits. They found that members of the Royal Society and National Academy of Sciences were almost twice as likely to report engaging in arts and crafts pursuits as the general public. Eminent Nobel laureate scientists were almost three times more likely to report such activities.  http://www.discovermagazine.com › mind › does-evidence-support-the-artis..

As Einstein, himself noted: “The greatest scientists are artists as well”.

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Ruby and copper hues.

Angel of Waters sculpture (1/3 scale to size  NYC Central Park icon), copper beaded tree, silver sequinned tree, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, encaustic by Elina Zebergs and cold wax art by Peg Wells.

“The displays  at Fairweather’s are like amazing art installations.”

Emerald  and turquoise hues.

“Moonlight and Waves” original oila by Ron Nicolaides, hand painted ornaments, mouth blown seeded glass bubble vase, hand made glass “Ocean” platters by Sandy and Bob Lercari, faux wall by Brian Anderson.

“Art in hues, displays in jewel tones and fine interior design.”

 

Pearl and moonstone hues.

Handmade abalone shell trees,  handmade painted birch tree centerpieces, handmade sequinned trees, Theodore Roosevelt quote  “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are”  calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, handmade zinc finials, mouth blown mercury glass finials with ceramic urn filled with gold leaf and silver rhinestone ornaments. “The Guardian” Flemish oil strike off by Jon Anni.

“Fairweather’s gives one a visual experience. All. The. Time.”

Topaz and onyx hues.

Pen and ink art by Dorota Haber-Lehigh, mixed media art by JoAnn Pari-Mueller,  pottery by Suzy Holland, wood boxes by Fred Lukens, handmade driftwood furniture, and coastal elk photograph by Neal Maine.

East window display featuring art by Lee Munsell, calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, mixed media art by James Waterman,  handcut wood stars, handmade crystal trees, pearl and copper tree and mercury glass ornaments.

 “Window displays for the HUE exhibition have the important duty of helping define Fairweather’s  unique brand.”

West window display featuring clipped pear branch tree, vintage tinsel tree, hand-carved wood candlestick, pair of angels by a master of craft, silver plaster frame, handmade recycled wood pedestals.

“Viewed beautifully sculptured figurines. Each pose so real. Each one almost seems to come to life.”

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall for Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

HUE hostesses Joan, Kathy, Katie, Denise, Kay and Saundra.

“How wonderful is it, though, when your people come to dress…like this?”

HUE on exhibit through December 23.

 

“Can you imagine the time spent beforehand – conceptualizing, planning and installing?”

If you cannot, sharing a time lapse video of an art installation earlier in 2019…

Video represents one section of the Fairweather Gallery showing days of after hours installation work including spackling, painting, displaying, accessorizing and lighting the selected artworks for  the ‘Life Abundant’ exhibition April 2019

 

“Fairweather House and Gallery is one of the Historic Gilbert District’s most sought after destinations offering an ever-changing amazing visual experience.” 

 

A premier source for stylish, chic furnishings, unexpected original art, and the most extraordinary accessories curated through 30 years of  interior design background.
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