Pacific Force III by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

 

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, Seaside Oregon. Jan. 2018.

Q: Why the large wave, you ask?

A: A high surf advisory was issued for the northern Oregon coast according to the National Weather Service. The coast will see breaking waves on the beaches much higher than normal. Forecasters said ocean swells will be above 60 feet for most of the day January 19, 2018. The high surf advisory has caused officials to keep some North Coast Oregon and South Coast Washington beaches closed.

 

 

 

January 19, 2018

Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.

Pacific Force I, Pacific Force II and Pacific  Force III

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse.  Seaside Oregon.

Pacific Force I  (wave hgt. 176′)

Pacific Force II (wave hgt. 183′)

Pacific Force III (wave hgt. 211′)

Q: Where in the world is Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, you ask?

 

A: Tillamook Rock Lighthouse stands 133 feet above sea level and sits on a rock a mile off the beach of Seaside and is west of Tillamook Head in Clatsop County, Oregon. Operating from 1881 to 1957, the lighthouse was nicknamed Terrible Tilly for its ferocious storms and the difficulties facing lighthouse keepers stationed there. It was the most expensive lighthouse built in the United States up to that time.  An isolated, storm-battered basaltic island less than an acre in size, Tillamook Rock Lighthouse is 20 miles south of the mouth of the Columbia River. Violently churning seas crash against the steep sides of the Rock and surge high up its sloping eastern face. Tillamook Rock is part of Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge, and the lighthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

 

100% profits in support of  NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy

  For more about the photographer, please go to  artists/ Neal Maine  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com 

 

 

https://traveloregon.com › … › Culture & History › Historic Sites & Oregon Trail

 

 Resting atop a sea stack of basalt, more than a mile off the banks of Oregon’s  Seaside North Coast, the notorious Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, (nicknamed “Terrible Tilly”), is the stuff of aged lore. Although long closed to the public, she still stands today, though battered and …

 

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse – The Oregon Encyclopedia
https://oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/tillamook_rock_lighthouse/
Tillamook Rock Lighthouse sits on a rock a mile offshore of Tillamook Head in Clatsop County, Oregon. Operating from 1881 to 1957, the lighthouse was …

 

“Pacific Force IV”  by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

 

100% Profits to NCLC, North Coast Land Conservancy

Inspired by the beach and nature, Peg Wells has prepared a gallery exhibit composed of  hot wax encaustic  and cold wax collage. The work is decorative, but with a purpose that is secure in the strength of using natural elements. Her provocative style proves that a quiet approach can have a very powerful effect.  Summer time resident and artist Peg Wells, who exhibits in the winter-season at the Saddle Brooke Resort/ Primary Studio in Arizona, presents new work in an ocean theme for Fairweather’s.  WELCOME BACK TO SEASIDE!

 

 

“Wonder of the Sea” by Peg Wells.  Cold Wax Painting.

“From the Depths” by Peg Wells.  Cold Wax Painting.

 

Q: What is Cold Wax Painting, you ask?

 

A: Cold Wax Painting is not defined by subject matter nor the degree of realism or abstraction, Cold Wax Painting is unified by artists’ shared interest in experimentation, texture and the physicality of paint layers. In its own way, Cold Wax Painting blurs the line between oil painting and encaustic painting.

 

Cold Wax is a mixture of natural beeswax, solvent and a small amount of  resin. The term “cold” in beeswax painting refers to the fact that heat is not required for working with this wax medium – as it dries by solvent evaporation, rather than the cooling of the wax, as in encaustic painting. As the solvent evaporates out of the medium, the soft wax hardens to the density of a beeswax candle.

Cold Wax is creating a variety of textures within a painting. It gives a clean break off the brush or knife, retaining the sharp peaks of impasto. These working properties allow for expressive brush marks and the ability to carve into paint layers with palette knives. Cold Wax also gives oil colors a beautiful translucent quality, similar to the seductive surfaces of encaustic paintings.

 

Q: What is encaustic painting, you ask?

A: Pronunciation: en-caws-tick, is a paint consisting of pigment mixed with beeswax and fixed with heat after its application. –n. The Greek word is enkaustikos –to burn in.

 

Encaustic dates back to the ancient Greeks, as far back as the 5th century BC. Ancient ship builders used beeswax, resin to seal, and waterproof their vessels. Ultimately, they began adding pigment to the wax-giving rise to the decoration of spectacular ships. To paint with encaustic, a combination of beeswax, resin and pigment is combined and then melted to a liquid state. Encaustic paintings have many layers of wax. Depending on the piece, it is not uncommon to have anywhere from 25-50 layers.

 

 

“Surf” Encaustic by Peg Wells

 

It’s not always obvious whether an abstract work of art should be hung vertically or horizontally.  Oftentimes on a contemporary piece, the artist signs that work on the back, which  allows the  gallerist and interested clients to determine how the art could be oriented for display.

 

 

 

Artist grace note

 

“I am grateful that my art found a gallery presence for my seventh summer season with you! I do appreciate your support of my art and me as an artist. I hope that my art will find new homes and that it will bring as much pleasure to people as it has given me create. Thank you.”Peg Wells

 

WELCOME BACK TO SEASIDE!

 

For more information about the gallery, please go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Photo by Neal Maine / PacificLight Images
Bald eagles on Clatsop Beach.

Image title:  Eagle Speak

 

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. His photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

PacificLight Images is dedicated to working with coastal communities to protect wildlife habitat and its connectivity. A percentage of all photography sales are donated to North Coast Land Conservancy to help further this goal.

Eagle Sunrise by Neal Maine

 

On June 20th, 1782 the American Bald eagle was chosen as the symbol of the United States of American because of its long life, strength, majestic look and its representation of the freedoms enshrined in out constitution.

 

 

Image title:  Shaped by Wind.  Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images

 

Eagle conservation lecture  notes by naturalist Neal Maine:

Neal Maine graduated from Seaside High, returned as an educator in the Seaside School District.

It was not until 20 years after collage that he viewed an eagle on the North coast for the first time!

In 1961, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) counted  only 471 pairs of Amercian Bald Eagles.

 

 

Neal Maine lectures during a Fairweather Gallery event.

 

 

July 7- July 31

Fairweather House and Gallery

100 Turtles project by Emily Miller

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and the unknown, and a place where our connection to larger natural systems becomes clear. My artwork focuses on the delight of exploring this mysterious and beautiful environment. I found a positive voice in SeaLegacy, a conservation group creating a movement towards healthy oceans through visual storytelling. 25% of July sale proceeds in support of SeaLegacy,”  Emily Miller.

Launching of the 100 Turtles project by artist Emily Miller, who has spent the early summer sculpting tiny ceramic sea turtles: curling and shaping two hundred front flippers and carving details into two hundred eyes.

 

 

 

 I found a positive voice in SeaLegacy, a conservation group creating a movement towards healthy oceans through visual storytelling. 25% of July sale proceeds in support of SeaLegacy,”  Emily Miller.

 

 

For more info go to

 

http://ejmillerfineart.com/news/2018/06/14/100-turtles-project/

 

 

Read more:

The Story of Silent Spring. How a courageous woman took on the chemical industry and raised important questions about humankind’s impact …

http://www.rachelcarson.org/

Perhaps the finest nature writer of the Twentieth Century, Rachel Carson (1907-1964) is remembered more today as the woman who challenged the notion that …

 

To view more Neal Maine images, please visit  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Full Moon Bowl by Emily Miller

 

 

“I have a brand new full moon bowl (first one out of the kiln!) Creating a different perspective on my passion for exploring unknown environments in art. Although most of my artwork has focused on the ocean, I find the beauty, mystery, and science of outer space as compelling as the deep-sea.”  —Emily Miller, artist

 

Q: When is the full moon in June, you ask?

A: The full moon will be on June 27 and June 28. To the casual observer, however, the moon will appear full the day before and after its peak brightness. https://www.moongiant.com/moonphases/June/2018

 

 

Concept drawings by Emily Miller.

“I love the fanciful scientific names for the lunar “seas” (which are actually flat regions of dark basalt where lava oozed to the surface, pulled by Earth’s gravity up towards the near side of the moon). The Sea of Nectar and the Sea of Clouds are two of my favorites. I also love that the Seas of Tranquility and Crises are right next to each other.”  Emily Miller

 

 

“I am captivated by the beautiful contrast between light and darkness in our natural world, and the necessity of both for life to thrive. .”  Emily Miller

 

 

Deep blue spiny sea urchin bowl

 

 

White moonlight spiny sea urchin bowl

 Hand made and artist signed porcelain bowls by Emily Miller

 

 

Sea anemone porcelain vases by Emily Miller.

Heavily textured raw porcelain exteriors are  reminiscent of sunlight patterns in a shallow lagoon.

Hand made and signed by the artist.

Watertight.

 

Read more about Emily Miller at https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/fairweather-house…gallery/…/1…

 

Save the date and time

Opening artist reception for the exhibition  “Ocean Folk”

July 7, 5-7:pm

Emily Miller launches her 100 Turtles project at the Fairweather Gallery

 

“Here is the post I just wrote about my 100 Turtles project.” Emily Miller

  http://ejmillerfineart.com/news/2018/06/14/100-turtles-project/

 

 

End note: Two Fairweather Gallery artists featuring a North Oregon coast night scene with a full moon over the Pacific Ocean, which is the largest ocean in the world.   At full moon, the Moon and Sun are in a straight line on opposite sides of the Earth. Their gravitational forces combine to create larger waves.

“Night Sea” by Ron Nicolaides.  Original oil on Linen.

 

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/Artist/Ron/Nicolaides.html

 

  “North Coast Sea” by Nicholas Oberling.  Original oil on linen.

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/welcoming-nicholas-oberling-art.

 

Precious moonstone, a translucent, opalescent, pearly blue gemstone cuff bracelet by Alan Stockam. Signed and numbered by the silversmith.

 

 

 

For more about the gallery, please go to www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Artist Carolyn Macpherson has offered several Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episodes at Fairweather’s!

 

Last month, the artist explained why color was added,  why the composition changed and so on.  Patrons watched and realized how much effort goes into one painting and how unique the process really is.

For more info about the artist, go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com   …artists/ …Carolyn Macpherson

 

Q: What is a Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episode, you ask?

A: Fariweather House and Gallery has had the privilege to offer do painting demonstrations, titled Painting Seaside LIVE ™ during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walks. Resident artists have been very generous, as it is a compliment to be asked, and they always immediately respond with an enthusiastic, “yes” when asked to perform a painting episode.

 

“Painting is a passion, and the Painting Seaside LIVE ™ process gives the artists the chance to share this passion with the onlookers. Artists enjoy the opportunity being authentic in what they are experiencing. Surely, the LIVE episodes, sponsored by Fairweather House and Gallery, are, truly, one of the ways that artists “live the process” and help patrons grow to appreciate art, as well.” D. Fairweather, gallerist.

To read more about the gallery and view the artist’s work , please go to  http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Sunset at Tillamook Head” watercolor by Emily Milller

“A stormy winter sunset over Tillamook Head as seen from Seaside beach, on the northern Oregon coast. Brilliant oranges and pinks lit up the clouds and reflected in the waves for just a few minutes between rain showers. A low fog hanging over the headland created separation between the layers of trees. I set up to paint on a log near the high tide line, stopping only when the light faded and my paper was too wet to continue!”

 

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and unknown, amid constant cycles of change.” –Emily Miller

 

“Needles and the Haystack” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Two narrow sea stacks known as “The Needles” at Cannon Beach, next to Oregon’s iconic Haystack Rock. This was painted on a beautiful summer day, sitting on the steps leading down to the beach. The Needles are some of my favorite sea stacks on the Oregon coast!”

 

“Kites at Cannon Beach” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Colorful kites on a summer afternoon fly over Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach, on the northern Oregon coast.”

 

“Sea Stacks at Siletz Bay” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Wind-swept trees grow on a series of sea stacks known as “Four Brothers” in Siletz Bay, outside Lincoln City on Oregon’s central coast. The water was calm and shallow on this summer morning, when I set up in the warm sand to paint with a friend.”

 

 

“Cape Meares Lighthouse” watercolor by Emily Miller

“The tiny Cape Meares lighthouse is the smallest lighthouse in Oregon, but worked as a beacon visible for 21 miles out to sea from 1890 to 1963. Its unique octagonal tower sits on a high cliff on the northern Oregon coast near Tillamook. The lighthouse is accessible down a shady, forested path, with the tower and red lens framed by mossy trees.”

 

“Exploring the Oregon coast with my painting kit and camera is one of my greatest joys. Every visit creates a stronger bond with my favorite beaches and trails, beautiful in all weathers and seasons.” –Emily Miller

 

Q:  What are sea stacks, you ask?

A:  Sea stacks are blocks of erosion-resistant rock isolated from the land by sea. Sea stacks begin as part of a headland or sea cliff. Relentless pounding by waves erodes the softer, weaker parts of a rock first leaving harder, more resistant rock behind.

The Oregon coastline naturally has areas of rocky headlands alternating with sandy coves due to variation in the local rock types. As waves approach the shore, they are refracted nearly parallel to shore so that wave energy is concentrated on headlands. Rocky cliffs develop on the headlands and sand is deposited in the bays, forming beaches.

Sea stacks sit like giants half-submerged in the ocean, not far from shore. As if they were massive, mythological sentinels set with the mission to guard Oregon’s coast. They are indeed ancient – millions and millions of years old.   www.nature.nps.gov/geology

 

For more info, go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

“The Escarpment” by Barbara Martin

Mixed media

Q: What is an escarpment, you ask?

A:  An escarpment  is a long, high area of continuous rock that has one steep side.  The Oregon coast escarpments are  deeply serrated, having been carved up by watercourses over millions of years.

An escarpment image along the Oregon coast.

About the artist:

Barbara Martin grew up on three continents — and has lived in ten states coast to coast. She earned an MBA, is a certified creativity coach and teaches  art classes.

She is a guild member of the Arts Council Lake Oswego, the Green Cab, and Westside Art Share near Portland.

Her work is contemporary in style and leans toward the abstract and sometimes surreal or visionary.

Barbara Martin

Descended from a line of story tellers and herbalists, inspirations come from repressed dreams and the natural world.

Recent recognitions include a juror’s award in the national “Dream” show at ARC Gallery in San Francisco, and publication in numerous journals.

 

 

 

 

In addition, to  the June 2018 Fairweather Gallery’s “Sense of Place” exhibition, Barbara Martin’s juried Oregon shows include “Abstract Catalyst” at Verum Ultimum Gallery in Portland, the 2017 Portland BIG 500, and “Raining Cats and Dogs” at the Portland’5.

 

 

Grace note received.

“Just got word I’ve been awarded a generous RACC Professional Development grant!!! Super helpful and really exciting looking ahead.” –-Barbara Martin

 

Barbara Martin’s rough draft of her artist speech for the opening reception at Fairweather’s.  Note, even the paper is colorful!

 

 

Barbara Martin did just fine,”  posted Linda Fenton Mendenhall/ Art Walk photographer.

 

And, so,  now, a quote dedicated to Barbara Martin: from a Fairweather art card:

 

Perseverance

If a task is one begun

Never leave it until it is done.

Be it labor big or small,

Do it well or not at all.

AUTHOR UNKNOWN

Quote shared from a Fairweather art card.

 

www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com