Full Moon Bowl by Emily Miller

 

 

“I have a brand new full moon bowl (first one out of the kiln!) Creating a different perspective on my passion for exploring unknown environments in art. Although most of my artwork has focused on the ocean, I find the beauty, mystery, and science of outer space as compelling as the deep-sea.”  —Emily Miller, artist

 

Q: When is the full moon in June, you ask?

A: The full moon will be on June 27 and June 28. To the casual observer, however, the moon will appear full the day before and after its peak brightness. https://www.moongiant.com/moonphases/June/2018

 

 

Concept drawings by Emily Miller.

“I love the fanciful scientific names for the lunar “seas” (which are actually flat regions of dark basalt where lava oozed to the surface, pulled by Earth’s gravity up towards the near side of the moon). The Sea of Nectar and the Sea of Clouds are two of my favorites. I also love that the Seas of Tranquility and Crises are right next to each other.”  Emily Miller

 

 

“I am captivated by the beautiful contrast between light and darkness in our natural world, and the necessity of both for life to thrive. .”  Emily Miller

 

 

 Spiny urchin porcelain bowls by Emily Miller

 

 

Sea anemone porcelain vases by Emily Miller.

Heavily textured raw porcelain exteriors are  reminiscent of sunlight patterns in a shallow lagoon. Watertight.

 

Read more about Emily Miller at https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/tag/fairweather-house…gallery/…/1…

 

Save the date and time

Opening artist reception for the exhibition  “Ocean Folk”

July 7, 5-7:pm

Emily Miller launches her 100 Turtles project at the Fairweather Gallery

 

“Here is the post I just wrote about my 100 Turtles project.” Emily Miller

  http://ejmillerfineart.com/news/2018/06/14/100-turtles-project/

 

 

End note: Two Fairweather Gallery artists featuring a North Oregon coast night scene with a full moon over the Pacific Ocean, which is the largest ocean in the world.   At full moon, the Moon and Sun are in a straight line on opposite sides of the Earth. Their gravitational forces combine to create larger waves.

“Night Sea” by Ron Nicolaides.  Original oil on Linen.

 

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/Artist/Ron/Nicolaides.html

 

  “North Coast Sea” by Nicholas Oberling.  Original oil on linen.

For more info about the artist, please go to  https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wordpress.com/…/welcoming-nicholas-oberling-art.

 

Precious moonstone, a translucent, opalescent, pearly blue gemstone cuff bracelet by Alan Stockam. Signed and numbered by the silversmith.

 

 

 

 

 

Artist Carolyn Macpherson has offered several Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episodes at Fairweather’s!

 

Last month, the artist explained why color was added,  why the composition changed and so on.  Patrons watched and realized how much effort goes into one painting and how unique the process really is.

For more info about the artist, go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com   …artists/ …Carolyn Macpherson

 

Q: What is a Painting Seaside LIVE ™ episode, you ask?

A: Fariweather House and Gallery has had the privilege to offer do painting demonstrations, titled Painting Seaside LIVE ™ during the Seaside First Saturday Art Walks. Resident artists have been very generous, as it is a compliment to be asked, and they always immediately respond with an enthusiastic, “yes” when asked to perform a painting episode.

 

“Painting is a passion, and the Painting Seaside LIVE ™ process gives the artists the chance to share this passion with the onlookers. Artists enjoy the opportunity being authentic in what they are experiencing. Surely, the LIVE episodes, sponsored by Fairweather House and Gallery, are, truly, one of the ways that artists “live the process” and help patrons grow to appreciate art, as well.” D. Fairweather, gallerist.

To read more about the gallery and view the artist’s work , please go to  http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Sunset at Tillamook Head” watercolor by Emily Milller

“A stormy winter sunset over Tillamook Head as seen from Seaside beach, on the northern Oregon coast. Brilliant oranges and pinks lit up the clouds and reflected in the waves for just a few minutes between rain showers. A low fog hanging over the headland created separation between the layers of trees. I set up to paint on a log near the high tide line, stopping only when the light faded and my paper was too wet to continue!”

 

 

“I have spent my life on the coast, and all my artwork has its roots in my love of the sea. I see the coast as a border between the known and unknown, amid constant cycles of change.” –Emily Miller

 

“Needles and the Haystack” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Two narrow sea stacks known as “The Needles” at Cannon Beach, next to Oregon’s iconic Haystack Rock. This was painted on a beautiful summer day, sitting on the steps leading down to the beach. The Needles are some of my favorite sea stacks on the Oregon coast!”

 

“Kites at Cannon Beach” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Colorful kites on a summer afternoon fly over Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach, on the northern Oregon coast.”

 

“Sea Stacks at Siletz Bay” watercolor by Emily Miller

“Wind-swept trees grow on a series of sea stacks known as “Four Brothers” in Siletz Bay, outside Lincoln City on Oregon’s central coast. The water was calm and shallow on this summer morning, when I set up in the warm sand to paint with a friend.”

 

 

“Cape Meares Lighthouse” watercolor by Emily Miller

“The tiny Cape Meares lighthouse is the smallest lighthouse in Oregon, but worked as a beacon visible for 21 miles out to sea from 1890 to 1963. Its unique octagonal tower sits on a high cliff on the northern Oregon coast near Tillamook. The lighthouse is accessible down a shady, forested path, with the tower and red lens framed by mossy trees.”

 

“Exploring the Oregon coast with my painting kit and camera is one of my greatest joys. Every visit creates a stronger bond with my favorite beaches and trails, beautiful in all weathers and seasons.” –Emily Miller

 

Q:  What are sea stacks, you ask?

A:  Sea stacks are blocks of erosion-resistant rock isolated from the land by sea. Sea stacks begin as part of a headland or sea cliff. Relentless pounding by waves erodes the softer, weaker parts of a rock first leaving harder, more resistant rock behind.

The Oregon coastline naturally has areas of rocky headlands alternating with sandy coves due to variation in the local rock types. As waves approach the shore, they are refracted nearly parallel to shore so that wave energy is concentrated on headlands. Rocky cliffs develop on the headlands and sand is deposited in the bays, forming beaches.

Sea stacks sit like giants half-submerged in the ocean, not far from shore. As if they were massive, mythological sentinels set with the mission to guard Oregon’s coast. They are indeed ancient – millions and millions of years old.   www.nature.nps.gov/geology

 

For more info, go to  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

 

 

 

“The Escarpment” by Barbara Martin

Mixed media

Q: What is an escarpment, you ask?

A:  An escarpment  is a long, high area of continuous rock that has one steep side.  The Oregon coast escarpments are  deeply serrated, having been carved up by watercourses over millions of years.

An escarpment image along the Oregon coast.

About the artist:

Barbara Martin grew up on three continents — and has lived in ten states coast to coast. She earned an MBA, is a certified creativity coach and teaches  art classes.

She is a guild member of the Arts Council Lake Oswego, the Green Cab, and Westside Art Share near Portland.

Her work is contemporary in style and leans toward the abstract and sometimes surreal or visionary.

Barbara Martin

Descended from a line of story tellers and herbalists, inspirations come from repressed dreams and the natural world.

Recent recognitions include a juror’s award in the national “Dream” show at ARC Gallery in San Francisco, and publication in numerous journals.

 

 

 

 

In addition, to  the June 2018 Fairweather Gallery’s “Sense of Place” exhibition, Barbara Martin’s juried Oregon shows include “Abstract Catalyst” at Verum Ultimum Gallery in Portland, the 2017 Portland BIG 500, and “Raining Cats and Dogs” at the Portland’5.

 

 

Grace note received.

“Just got word I’ve been awarded a generous RACC Professional Development grant!!! Super helpful and really exciting looking ahead.” –-Barbara Martin

 

Barbara Martin’s rough draft of her artist speech for the opening reception at Fairweather’s.  Note, even the paper is colorful!

 

 

Barbara Martin did just fine,”  posted Linda Fenton Mendenhall/ Art Walk photographer.

 

And, so,  now, a quote dedicated to Barbara Martin: from a Fairweather art card:

 

Perseverance

If a task is one begun

Never leave it until it is done.

Be it labor big or small,

Do it well or not at all.

AUTHOR UNKNOWN

Quote shared from a Fairweather art card.

 

www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

TO PARE:  The theme for May 2018 for the Fairweather Gallery

 

“When I first reviewed the Fairweather Gallery’s list of themes for 2018, I was intrigued.  So many interesting choices.  As a lover of words and all that they imply, I was attracted to the theme “pare”, “pear” or “pair.  How unusual!  What to choose?  I selected “pare.”

“Pare” usually means “to cut back”, to “slice away”, to “remove”, and even “to simplify.”  When I thought of the “to simplify”, I was hooked.  Little did I know that I nearly shot myself in the foot!

As an artist, “to simplify” means to remove all that is not absolutely necessary to say what I want to say.  The challenge is how few lines, how few colors, how few marks on my paper convey my meaning.  I thought of the cave paintings from 30,000- 40,000 years ago in France and Spain.  How simple and how elegant.

 

 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/…/journey-oldest-cave-paintings-world

Later, Picasso who was also intrigued by simplifying, drew a series of bulls.  The merest line conveyed the strength, the majesty of this noble animal.

 

www.dailyartmagazine.com/pablo-picassos-bulls-road-simplicity

 

So, “to pare” is good for one’s art.  No more worrying about what is pretty, what will sell, just get to the point!  If one line can convey your message, use it.  Do not be too wordy or explain too much! 

 

 

Too much thinking about “to pare”; going back to the homonyms?  Pear, pair, pare, or au pair?  That opens up a world. 

 

There is a painting here by Marga that is an eye-stopper and it is about “pears”.  What a hoot!

“Pears Illustrated, Swimsuit edition” by Marga Stanley

 And the many others which the artists translated “to pare”, “to pair”, or quite simply “pears”.

 

 

I must admit that I gave into to all in my artwork.  This was a challenging theme that made me think.  I will move toward more line work in my efforts to come to the point, and I shall work “to pare”. 

 

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and her art.

And, as I always discover when stretching, thinking is hard work.”  —Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD., writer, educator and artist.

 

For more info about the artist, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair,  Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Patti Isaacs, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

 

 

Q: Why do artists often study painting pears, you ask?

A: Indeed, every artist has spent hours staring at pears, later to paint pears to learn the study of light, shading and perspective.

 

Cézanne once proclaimed, “With a pear I want to astonish Paris,” and he succeeded, even in his most deceptively simple still life paintings, to dazzle and delight.

L.1988.62.32

Turning to the pears grown in the vicinity of the family’s estate, Cézanne dispensed with traditional one-point perspective and examined the fruit, plates, and table from various viewpoints—straight on, above, and sideways.

 

Display featuring pear art by Bill Baily, abstract paintings by Kimberly Reed and abstract art by Diane Copenhaver.

The exhibitions(s) “To Pare Perfect”, aka “Perfect Pear”,  and, too, aka “Perfect Pair” through May 31 at Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Ph.D. 

 

A Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.,  Latin Philosophiae doctor) is the highest academic degree awarded by universities in most countries.

 

As part of her lifelong interest in and enjoyment of art, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, PhD. has been painting in watercolor, water media including marbling and inks, pastel, and collage for many years. In combination with her work as a free-lance writer and educator, her painting allows her to continue developing her creativity and technical skills.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett works primarily wet-into-wet and strives for dramatic value patterns. Bright colors, an emphasis on the play of light, and a touch of whimsy mark her paintings. She enjoys painting a wide variety of subjects.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett was a juried member of the Arizona Artists Guild and is currently a juried member of the Watercolor Society of Oregon. She has exhibited in numerous juried art competitions. Her work is in private collections in various parts of the U.S., England, Canada, and Switzerland.

 

 

 

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett leads classes in watercolor, water media including marbling and inks, pastel, collage and paper marbling.

 

And, too, Jo Pomeroy Crockett is co-founder of the Astoria Art Loft located at 106 Third Street.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett leads classes at Dots and Doodles located at 303 Marine Drive in Astoria, as well.

 

Q: What is paper marbling, you ask?

A: Paper marbling is a method of aqueous surface design, which can produce patterns similar to smooth marble or other kinds of stone. Early in its history, marbled paper was used for important documents. Marbling always creates a one-of-a-kind monograph. Even if the exact same process was used, variations in the water, the artist’s hand movements, even the dust particles in the air prevent an exact duplicate. As such, marbled paper was used to prevent forgeries and erasure. For centuries, the secrets of marbling paper were kept closely among the masters.  In the business of book binding, marbling was also used on the edges of ledgers. Theoretically, if a single leaf of the ledger was taken, the pattern would be disrupted.

Go to: https://blog.bookstellyouwhy.com/the-history-and-techniques-of-marbled-paper

And too, for more info: Richard J. Wolfe author, Marbled Paper: Its History, Techniques, and Patterns: With Special Reference to the Relationship of Marbling to Bookbinding in Europe and the Western World.

 

Marbled paper art by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

 

Marbled paper art by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.

For more about Jo Pomeroy-Crockett,  please visit the artist’s tab at  www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Reprinting a  2014 grace note received:

“I particularly enjoyed the artist, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, who shared her comments regarding gratitude. I thought about her as I read  Rick Warren. His sentiments mirror those of your guest. I hope that you will share them with her.”  –– Gary

Sidenote:  Yes, the note was shared with Jo Pomeroy-Crockett.   

And, too, by  request, reprinting the Gratitude lecture by Jo Pomeroy-Crockettt/ May, 2014:

“Denise Fairweather asked me to speak briefly on GRATITUDE. GRATITUDE, as you may know, is the theme of the May exhibit. Last October, when I was privileged to exhibit some of my artwork here in this gallery, Denise gave me the opportunity to select a month in 2014 to exhibit more of my paintings. We looked over the various themes for 2014 and while all the themes were of interest, I was drawn to GRATITUDE. At this point in my life, I am very thankful, grateful for so many things.

As an artist, I appreciate Nietzsche’s view that “The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. No matter what one’s level of experience, there is sheer magic as a painting comes into being. Joy and gratitude are essential to the creative process as are perseverance, determination, and work. When a painting turns out well, I always breathe a sigh of relief and say THANK YOU. As someone once said, “If the only prayer you said was thank you, that would be enough.” Eckhert

GRATITUDE, in my view, is central to good mental and spiritual health. I think that it is virtually impossible to be grateful for one’s life and to be depressed at the same time. As Steve Maraboli wrote, “Those with a grateful mindset tend to see the message in the mess. Even though life may knock them down, the grateful find reasons, if even small ones, to get up.”

The act of doing art also leads to good mental and spiritual health. Many of us have an inner drive to draw or paint or sculpt. It is so strong that if we do not do art, we grow restless and uneasy. The way to peace is simply, to draw or paint or think art. We also know the value of doing art in treating emotional/mental problems. Psychotic patients in one treatment center were taught that when they suspected a psychotic episode was coming, they immediately began to do art. In almost all cases, the psychotic episode was avoided.

GRATITUDE has many shades and much depth. We all know about being thankful, in general. But what about the gifts we are born with, the talents we have been given. Most of us discover our special gifts by adolescence, or before, or sometimes, later. Do we have a responsibility to develop those gifts?

In my professional work, I listened to many people talk about their goals, their problems, and occasionally, those things they really loved doing. More often than not, the things they really loved were not the work-related activities they considered essential to earning a living. They relegated their personal passions to sometime in the future, when “the kids are out on their own, when I can have time to myself, . ..” Many gifts seem to be pushed into the background in the interest of earning a living. One can understand, certainly, but what a price we pay.

I think each of us has a responsibility to develop our gifts, our talents. And yes, we also have a responsibility to support our families. And yes, life does interfere in developing our gifts. HOWEVER, I have observed that most of us, at some time in our lives, manage to heed that inner voice and to develop our talents.

I taught art classes for many years, often in retirement communities such as Sun City, AZ, I worked with many budding artists who were finally tapping into their artistic gifts. Whether their artistic talents were just appearing in the lifelong developmental process or the artists were finally acknowledging their artistic bent, I have no way of knowing. But, the budding artists were, at last, listening to their inner gifts demanding to get out . One painting student, at 96 and with macular degeneration never missed a watercolor class because he was determined to “paint well”.

I was blessed to have a grandfather who was an artist and an engraver. From the time I was 3 yrs. old, he encouraged me to draw and regularly critiqued by creations. One time, when I was about 10, he added a nose extension to one of my ballerinas saying, “Even beautiful dancers have noses.” To this day, I am very conscious about drawing people with plenty of nose.

As for today, I am grateful and thankful for the gifts I have been given. I work hard to develop my art gift and daily do something “artful” – drawing, painting, thinking, planning.

I believe that gratitude is essential as a mindset. I think it helps avoid arrogance, the sense of self-importance, and depression. In art or other artistic endeavors, I believe it leads to willingness to experiment, to try new materials, and to grow as an artist.

As Cicero noted, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, it is the parent of all others.”  —Jo Pomeroy Crockett, PhD.

 

Indeed, Fairweather House and Gallery is grateful to represent Jo Pomeroy-Crockett  in Seaside, Oregon.

 

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair,  Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Patti Isaacs, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Negotiation” original art by Lisa Wiser.

“I do have a pair of pears on canvas as well as a few other perfect pairs of other items. Ha! Confusing eh? I will focus on pairs of pears. Heading down into the studio now! ”  — 😍🍐🍐Lisa Wiser

 

About  Lisa Wiser, pear artist:

Lisa Wiser is a visual artist living and working in Lake Oswego, Oregon. Her representational work is characterized by vivid color, great depth of space and attention to detail. She credits her father for instilling a love of drawing and painting while teaching her to draw at a young age.

“Leafy Pears” original oil on canvas by Lisa Wiser.

 

More about Lisa Wiser, pear artist:

Lisa earned a BS Degree in Art Education from the University of Oregon in 1978 and has completed graduate coursework in graphic design, art education and painting. Lisa has been invited to serve in both curatorial and juror positions for various arts organizations in the area. She has taught art from pre-school through college and adult level courses and has recently retired as a substitute art teacher for her local school district to devote more time to her painting.

 

 

“Bartlett Pears” original art by Lisa Wiser.

The Bartlett pear  carries a true pyriform “pear shape:” a rounded bell on the bottom half of the fruit, then a definitive shoulder with a smaller top.

 

 

 

Q: Why do artists often study painting pears, you ask?

A:  Cézanne once proclaimed, “With a pear I want to astonish Paris,” and he succeeded, even in his most deceptively simple still lifes, to dazzle and delight.  Turning to the pears grown in the vicinity of the family’s estate, he dispensed with traditional one-point perspective and examined the fruit, plates, and table from various viewpoints—straight on, above, and sideways.

 

 

Still Life Pears, Paul Cezanne, 1885

 

Indeed, every artist has spent hours staring at pears, later to paint pears to learn the study of light, shading and perspective.


 

 

 

And, too, a grace note received about the blog article:

“I love the post. Fun and informative. I really like the information about why artists chose pears as a subject.”  —Lisa Wiser

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Through May 31

Perfect Pear, Pair,  Pare Exhibition

Regional artists were selected due to their art related to scale and perspective, and the way things correlate and interact.

Featuring artists Lisa Wiser, Patti Isaacs, Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, Blue Bond, Marga Stanley, Bill Baily, and Lynda Campbell.