Coastal Elk Encaustic (beeswax) on wood panel by Gregory Bell.

 

Q: What is encaustic (beeswax) painting, you ask?

 

A:  Encaustic painting involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added.  The beeswax is applied to a surface –usually prepared wood though canvas and other materials are often used.  Metals tools and special brushes can be used to shape the paint before it cools.  Encaustic  painting was developed by the ancient Greek shipbuilders, who used not wax to seal their ships.

 

 

Loner.  Coyote encaustic by Gregory Bell

 

Gregory Bell is an Oregon native, born and raised here in the Pacific Northwest.

He was a student of the Oregon College of Art and Craft where he pursued studies in ceramics.

He has expressed himself visually through ceramic, glass, encaustic (wax) sculpture, encaustic painting and is an avid photographer.

He is a problem-solver and enjoys the challenge of relating his point of view through complex materials.

His work is shown locally and he has enjoyed success in juried shows.

He practices historical film photography, specifically wet-plate collodion (tintype) and platinum/palladium printing methods.

He works from his studio in Cannon Beach, Oregon.

 

 

Crow encaustic by Gregory Bell.  Two’s a Company encaustic by Gregory Bell.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery, 612 Broadway

SHADOWS, an exhibition through October,  focuses on the interplay of light and dark through selected art that expresses time as the fall season progresses.

New artwork by Northwest artists Diane Copenhaver, Gregory Bell, Janet Hickox,  Penelope Culbertson, Whelsey Whelp, Lisa Wiser, Karen E. Lewis, Tamara Johnson and Marga Stanley will be featured.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q:  Where, else, in the world has Christine’s art been, you ask?

A: As an adult she began her journey in creating her own books, which led to boxes, and then to making paper while living in Oregon. She has been fortunate to have taken a wide variety of classes at the Oregon School of Arts and Crafts, as well as, with international known artists in book binding and papermaking.

Christine lived in Panama for years where she learned to harvest and process plants from her garden to make paper for the books and boxes she creates. The wealth of vegetation forested experimentations and a great love of learning.

Building the Universe by Christine Trexel

Christine spent an inspiring week in late June at the Biennial Focus on Book Arts Conference as a member of the planning committee. The conference attracts participants from around the country with a wide variety of workshops taught by well-known book artists. It was an opportunity for learning new techniques and networking with some truly amazing artists. Christine was proud to have her piece “Building the Universe: The Platonic Solids” selected for a juried book arts show recently. The art piece was purchased by the Bainbridge Island Art Museum.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

The summer season ends with a most perfect exhibition titled: COLOR IT FALL 

New original art compositions revolve around the complementary clash of the deliberately heightened blues, dazzling oranges and brilliant yellows. 

Color is the dominant element in new fall art by Fairweather Gallery resident artists:

Handmade paper works by Christine Trexel 

 

Mixed media works by Jo Pomeroy Crockett

Oils by Michael Muldoon

Water colors by Carolyn Macpherson

Bead art by Gayle H. Seely

Origami paper works by Peggy Evans

Abstracts by Renee Rowe 

 

 

Introducing prize winning artist Mike Mason, who uses carefully dried, pressed and placed botanicals to create art to support natural habitats conservation. 

In addition, Fairweather’s welcomes new artists Lisa Wiser and Catherine Mahardy to the gallery. 

 

To read more about Christine, please go to http://www.faiweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Christine Trexel

 

 

Take note: This fall/winter Christine Trexel will be teaching classes  in Cannon Beach, Cannon Beach Art Gallery and in Astoria.

 

 

 On August 2nd FINDINGS, an opening art exhibition introduced past and present emerging artists at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Top row/ left to right images:  resident jeweler Renee Hafeman, art patrons, Joan, Art Walk hostess with Paul Brent, resident artist.

Middle row/ left to right images: art by Britney Drumheller, celebrity artist Britney Drumheller offers an art lecture, artist Emily Miller, and introducing emerging artist Whelpsy Whelp.

Bottom row/ left to right images: marine debris artist Karynn Kozij, Joan, Art Walk hostess demonstrating Octopus art, Paul Brent with Gail and Ellen, Art Walk hostesses at the Paul Brent Pop-Up Art Studio and Gallery, sponsored by Fairweather House and Gallery and The Gilbert Block Building, Denise, Kemmy Kay, Joan and Saundra FINDING art at the FINDINGS opening reception.

Q: What is an emerging artist, you ask?

A:  An emerging artist is considered an artist without commercial representation who has a dedicated art practice but has had limited opportunities to show at a gallery or non-profit spaces.

 

For more info please  go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.  Celebrating 11 years of sponsoring  NW regional acclaimed and emerging artists in 2017.

Renee Hafeman, vintage jewelry artist

FINDINGS in my work is a collection of tools and other articles used by an artisan to make jewelry.

 

Q:  What is the difference Between “Art Nouveau” and “Art Deco”, you ask?

A: Art Nouveau: means “new art,” reigned from roughly 1880 until just before World War I. It features naturalistic but stylized forms, often combined with more geometric shapes, particularly arcs, parabolas, and semicircles (think of the Eiffel Tower). The movement brought in natural forms that had often been overlooked like insects, weeds, even mythical faeries, as evidenced by Lalique jewelry or Tiffany lamps.

Art Deco emerged after World War I. In fact, the deprivations of the Great War years gave way to a whole new opulence and extravagance that defined the Jazz Age and the Art Deco aesthetic. The movement, prevalent from the 1920s until roughly the start of World War II, took its name from the 1925 Exposition Internationales des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, held in France and is characterized by streamlined and geometric shapes. It also utilized modern materials like chrome, stainless steel, and inlaid wood. If Art Deco dabbled with natural materials, they tended to be graphic or textural, like jagged fern leaves. As a result, Deco featured bold shapes like sunbursts and zigzags and broad curves.

Renee Hafeman offered an artist’s lecture during the opening reception of FINDINGS, an exhibition through August at Fairweather’s.

Note the difference?

Found for FINDINGS  before the artist created…

 

 

and after= Frazzled Model Mom by Karynn Kozij, marine debris artist.

Former model Fritzy’s hands are FULL: children in arms, cooking, cleaning, picking after everyone.  She looks and feels fabulous and feisty, is a friend and an inspiration for everyone.  She wears the BEST smile.  Dreamily recalls your young, carefree model days, she wears her sapphire glow so well on her every digit.  Litter Patron is highest on her volunteer list.  She is exceedingly proud of her twins.  It’s a juggling job being that of a mon; she handles it with grace!  –Karynn

 

 

 

Q: Who is Karynn Kozij, you ask?
A: Growing up on a farm in the province of Saskatchewan in Canada, Karynn Kozij loved perusing her Dad’s stash of materials in his shop, shed, garage and outbuildings. He had everything to create anything from a bird house or a toolbox, to a trailer or a potato planter.

She can’t pass up anything that at first seems to be trash but could possibly be turned into something else. She’s the one you see stopping on the sidewalk to pick up a squashed flat metal bottle cap or pull tab from a beer can, or a scrap of wire that is lying near a utility pole. She takes apart dried up writing pens before they go into the trash can to salvage the metal spring inside it. She is picking up trash, going through trash and making something out of nothing.

March 2016 spring storms spilled a treasure chest of marine debris onto our Northwest coast. It was sad and depressing to find so much trash on our shores. Karynn drove down onto the beach daily and hauled carloads of trash off the beach. The sadness and depression turned into fascination and obsession. With that awakening, she was unable to throw away so much perfectly good rope and became inspired.

Karynn saw possibility in those hundreds of feet of rope with an elaborate entry into the Marine Debris Art contest in Cannon Beach where she won the People’s Choice Award and third place in the judged contest with her entry, Octopus Family Reunion at the Beach.

Karynn works in many media. Something first destined as trash really grabs her eye; it’s a win win! Look closely in her art to see some part of it that was something else in a former life.

She was FOUND while picking up mail.

 

 

Foreign exchange student Kim visiting the Gearhart beach with Tillamook Head  of Seaside in the distance. Indeed, every piece found had foreign letters and numbers, hence, the name! 

Kim’s back story: Kim spent a school year here as an exchange student a few years ago and comes back every year to visit his Pacific Northwest host family.  He plans his study trips around the Spring tides for beach combing opportunities.  He is fascinated by the wind and ocean currents. He documents every single thing he finds from other countries.  Kim majors in world climatology and  is on a scholarship from the National Oceanic Administration.  –Karynn

 

 

But, wait,  there’s more…

 

Fortune teller, Pearl

 

Pearl’s back story:  Trust the Zodiac and its signs, reads Tarot cards and white horoscopes.  Gathers beach debris daily.  washes and sorts items according to a color chart.  Make art in communal workspaces and sells worldwide. Monitors marine debris worldwide; gets overwhelmed by it, but does her part locally in taching classes about recycling. –Karynn

 

Great Great Grandfather Kraken…

 

fondly watching over his offspring at the Gearhart beach.

Great Great Grandfather Kraken’s back story:  “Oh my arms don’t work like they used to.  Stories and novels have been written that I used to pull down ships with east but now I am weak and very, very old.  The little  guys snicker at my bowtie but I have always  liked  being a dapper dresser. I do love the lore of sea monsters.  –Karynn

 

 

Appreciation to Don Frank Photography.

Shoutout clues:

Karynn  Kozij lives in ____________, is the postmistress at the US Post Office in _____________, and will be at the Fairweather Gallery FINDINGS opening reception, Aug 5th with her marine debris art.  Octopus family reunion  at the ______________beach. The artist and her story of finding things was found while picking up mail in __________________.  Don Frank shows selected  art photos in the ____________Gallery in Seaside, as well.

 

Read what Eve Marx wrote about Karynn’s art:

View from the Porch: Art from the ‘Octopus’s Garden’

Artist transforms marine debris

Date: 2017-08-18 Seaside Signal

Story The Daily Astorian | Signal News
http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

The Daily Astorian | Signal News

http://www.dailyastorian.com/SS/news

Title: “Winged Wonder” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly. Location: Neacoxie Creek. Seaside/Gearhart.

Signed, matted and framed.

“Unless otherwise noted, images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.”

A Certificate of Authenticity is provided with each copyrighted and signed image.

Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy/NCLC.

 

 

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, rides on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD.Neal Maine

To read more about the photographer, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

Save the date and time. 
Neal Maine, scientist and wildlife photographer to present a lecture on the ecology of the North Coast habitats.

August 5th, 6:pm
Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway, Seaside, OR
Opening reception for FINDINGS

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk 

 

To read more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

Q: Where can the Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly be found, you ask?

A:  Habitat: Small ponds and slow streams. It perches on the tips of twigs, grasses and other vegetation.

Fun Creature Facts:

Distribution: Western U.S., West Indies and Central America south to Chile and Argentina.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly wings sit flat when perched and have a strong sustained flight; flitting about on gossamer wings and quiet as a whisper.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonflies are swift fliers, reminiscent of tiny airplanes.

Their eyes are huge, often meeting at the top of the head.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly, will eat almost any soft-bodied flying insect including mosquitoes, flies, small moths, mayflies, and flying ants or termites.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly are aptly named as they mimic hawks, relentlessly pursuing their prey.

The Latin name for this genus, Sympetrum, means “with rock” and refers to their habit of basking on rocks to absorb heat early in the day.

This species is one of the first dragonflies to emerge each year.

imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/insects/drgnfly

 

In addition, read more about North Coast dragonflys:

Wild Side: Dragonfly – Coastal Life – Coast Weekend

Aug 31, 2017 – Read Wild SideDragonfly from Coast Weekend. … By Lynette Rae McAdams. For Coast … Even while eating, a dragonfly can remain in flight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Renee’s Vintage Designs.

Signed Louis Vuitton.

Q: Who is Louis Vuitton, you ask?

A: Louis Vuitton is a fashion house and luxury retail company founded in 1854. The label’s LV monogram appears on most of its products, ranging from luxury trunks and leather goods, shoes, jewelry and accessories. Louis Vuitton is one of the world’s leading international fashion houses. For six consecutive years (2006–2012), Louis Vuitton was named the world’s most valuable luxury brand.

 

“Growing up, my grandmother would pull out her jewelry box, take each piece out one-by-one and explain in detail what it was, where it came from and why it was so special to her. This developed my love of antique and vintage jewelry. I started to think of how many treasured pieces are sitting in drawers and jewelry boxes, many handed down, some outdated, some broken and others, just put away because they didn’t match anything you wore. I decided enough of that! Let’s dig out those pieces and give them new life. As I design, I pray over my work that whoever wears this piece, may be blessed in some way. I thank God for blessing me with this creativity and passion.”–Renee Hafeman

 

 

 AUGUST 5th, 5-7:pm

FINDINGS opening reception 

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Fairweather House and Gallery

Renee Hafeman, jewelry designer, truly has found fabulous objects of desire, master pieces! Renee will be in attendance to discuss the development of her work and the ideas that drive her creativity. 

 

 

Exclusive signature jewelry available at Fairweather’s by Renee Vintage Designs.

 

Q: Who is Dolce & Gabbana, you ask?

A:  Dolce & Gabbana is an Italian luxury fashion house founded in 1985 by designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana. They won Perfume’s Academy “Most Feminine Flavor of the Year” in 1993 for their fragrance Dolce & Gabbana Parfum.

 

In addition FINDINGS will be the 11th (!) annual emerging artist exhibition! Fairweather’s will introduce current emerging artist Whelpsy Whelp.  

Fun fact: Fairweather has launched NW emerging artists Britney Drumheller, Nick Brakel, Linda Trexler, Ashley Howarth, Diane Copenhaver, Ashley Howarth, Gayle H. Seely, Kristin Qian and Rebecca Gore through the years. And, too, several of the talented artists will have new work for FINDINGS.  This is an event you do not want to miss!

FINDINGS will feature the juxtaposing an array of art from artists found at the recent BEAVER TALES ART SHOW and EXHIBITION in Seaside, as well.  New art by Emily Miller, Mariana Mace,  JoAnn Pari-Mueller and  Chris Boyer will be revealed, work created to depicting the pleasure of beach combing.

Seaside nature photographer, ecologist and biologist Neal Maine will speak at 6:pm. Summer time beverages and light bites.

Celebrating 13 years in 2017, Seaside First Saturday Art Walk is all about the arts.  Visitors meet artists, enjoy light bites, view artist demonstrations, see new work or enjoy live performances in music. The event is a free and held in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside. Complimentary parking is on the corner of Holladay and Oceanway.

 

To read more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.