On August 2nd FINDINGS, an opening art exhibition introduced past and present emerging artists at the Fairweather House and Gallery.

 

Top row/ left to right images:  resident jeweler Renee Hafeman, art patrons, Joan, Art Walk hostess with Paul Brent, resident artist.

Middle row/ left to right images: art by Britney Drumheller, celebrity artist Britney Drumheller offers an art lecture, artist Emily Miller, and introducing emerging artist Whelpsy Whelp.

Bottom row/ left to right images: marine debris artist Karynn Kozij, Joan, Art Walk hostess demonstrating Octopus art, Paul Brent with Gail and Ellen, Art Walk hostesses at the Paul Brent Pop-Up Art Studio and Gallery, sponsored by Fairweather House and Gallery and The Gilbert Block Building, Denise, Kemmy Kay, Joan and Saundra FINDING art at the FINDINGS opening reception.

Q: What is an emerging artist, you ask?

A:  An emerging artist is considered an artist without commercial representation who has a dedicated art practice but has had limited opportunities to show at a gallery or non-profit spaces.

 

For more info please  go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com.  Celebrating 11 years of sponsoring  NW regional acclaimed and emerging artists in 2017.

For more info please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Britney Drumheller

Cape Arago Lighthouse by Emily Miller

Late summer sun illuminates the turquoise waters and rocky, forested shoreline of the southern Oregon coast near Coos Bay. Cape Arago Lighthouse is visible in the distance.

Cape Arago Lighthouse was built on Chief’s Island in 1866 to guide merchant ships into Coos Bay, just 13 years after white settlers first arrived in the area. Chief’s Island is just offshore, but proved dangerous to access with multiple washed-out bridges and boat disasters over the years. The current lighthouse is the third to be built at Cape Arago. It was deactivated in 2006 after 140 years of service.

In 2013, the last bridge to the island was removed and the land transferred to the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians. The Confederate Tribes hope to establish an interpretive center on the mainland near the lighthouse.

Cleft of the Rock Lighthouse by Emily Miller

Late summer fog hangs over the horizon at Cape Perpetua, near Yachats on the central Oregon coast. The beacon from Cleft of the Rock Light can be seen 16 miles offshore, and might be welcomed at sea on these frequent foggy days.

The lighthouse and attached dwelling were built as a labor of love in 1976 by James Gibbs, a former Tillamook Rock Light attendant and lighthouse historian. He lived here until his death in 2010.

 


Yaquina Head Lighthouse from Cobble Beach by Emily Miller

Yaquina Head Lighthouse is the tallest lighthouse in Oregon, with a 93 ft. tower and a light that can be seen 19 miles out to sea. It was built in 1873 and continues to operate today. It is located on a high, exposed cliff near Newport, on Oregon’s central coast.

The lighthouse is part of the Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area, a federal reserve that is home to an incredible array of wildlife and beautiful coastline. The site has been popular with visitors since the 1930s, when nearly 12,000 visitors made it the 4th most visited lighthouse in the United States. Today it receives over 400,000 visitors per year.

A vein of magnetized iron runs through the bedrock of Yaquina Head, causing ships’ compasses to malfunction if they venture too near.

 

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse from Haystack Rock

Haystack Rock reflects in the shallow waters of an outgoing tide at Cannon Beach, on Oregon’s northern coast. A mile offshore, the Tillamook Rock lighthouse is visible in the distance. The lighthouse is located on a barren, exposed rock, situated to guide merchant ships to the mouth of the Columbia River.

Construction on the Tillamook Rock lighthouse began in 1879 and was not finished until 1881 due to powerful storms that made construction and transport of materials nearly impossible. The lighthouse became known as “Terrible Tilly”. Waves broke over the rock strong enough to drench the entire lighthouse, collapsing roofs, flooding the interior, clogging the mechanisms with debris, breaking loose boulders and sending them flying through the air. The lighthouse keepers were totally isolated and tasked with constant repairs.

In 1957 the lighthouse was deactivated after 77 years of service. After changing hands several times, it was most recently used as a columbarium where the ashes of around 30 people are stored.

“Lighthouses have a mythical quality. A lighthouse stands for untold stories of stormy nights, beautiful sunrises, and the hardship and magic of life at the edge of the sea. A lighthouse symbolizes the journey between wild ocean and safe harbor. This transition zone is one of my favorite places to explore.” –Emily Miller, artist


Emily Miller, artist

Last fall I took a road trip to visit and paint at all eleven lighthouses on the Oregon coast. Lighthouses have a mythical quality to me. They symbolize the journey between wild ocean and safe harbor. I love the ocean and have always lived near it. To me, the coast is a border between the known and unknown. This transition zone is one of my favorite places to explore.

I choose to paint the landscape view rather than close-ups or lighthouse interiors because my artwork is centered on the way we interact with our environments. I am most interested in how we alter the landscape to suit our needs, and how the landscape, in return, alters our structures over time.

The paintings were completed on location (en plein air) or in the studio from my many reference photos. The series is about half-finished.

I enjoy series projects like this because they provide a framework for exploring and understanding an area. I spend more time at beautiful places while I’m painting and photographing. The project gives me a reason to dig deeper into the history of a place, and discover new spots that I might have missed otherwise.
Each lighthouse has its own story. Tillamook Rock Lighthouse is just south of Seaside on a barren rock one mile offshore. It was pounded by incredible storms where waves broke boulders off the cliff side and crashed them into the lighthouse. You can see its silhouette from Ecola State Park and Cannon Beach. Cape Meares Lighthouse in Tillamook and Yaquina Head Light in Newport are both still active and you can go inside the tower and climb up the spiral stairs.

 

 

Emily Miller with her art:  anemone and sea urchin bowls and the Oregon light house series.

 

 

Grace Note received:

“Thanks again for a great Art Walk event FINDINGS, Fairweather opening reception. It was wonderful to see the new gallery layout and chat with the other artists. Someone asked me if I was making a book from the lighthouse painting series. I may do that once it has finished, and then you will not have to hunt down maps in the magazines anymore!–Emily Miller

 

 

 

“Quick update if you want to share with your clients. Now thru the end of 2017, I am donating 10% of my proceeds to local ocean conservancy and art organizations. Thank you for your part in making my art ventures a success!!”

 

And, too,  an encore request for the image of the Sea Urchin bowl with spines by Emily Miller.

Renee Hafeman, vintage jewelry artist

FINDINGS in my work is a collection of tools and other articles used by an artisan to make jewelry.

 

Q:  What is the difference Between “Art Nouveau” and “Art Deco”, you ask?

A: Art Nouveau: means “new art,” reigned from roughly 1880 until just before World War I. It features naturalistic but stylized forms, often combined with more geometric shapes, particularly arcs, parabolas, and semicircles (think of the Eiffel Tower). The movement brought in natural forms that had often been overlooked like insects, weeds, even mythical faeries, as evidenced by Lalique jewelry or Tiffany lamps.

Art Deco emerged after World War I. In fact, the deprivations of the Great War years gave way to a whole new opulence and extravagance that defined the Jazz Age and the Art Deco aesthetic. The movement, prevalent from the 1920s until roughly the start of World War II, took its name from the 1925 Exposition Internationales des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, held in France and is characterized by streamlined and geometric shapes. It also utilized modern materials like chrome, stainless steel, and inlaid wood. If Art Deco dabbled with natural materials, they tended to be graphic or textural, like jagged fern leaves. As a result, Deco featured bold shapes like sunbursts and zigzags and broad curves.

Renee Hafeman offered an artist’s lecture during the opening reception of FINDINGS, an exhibition through August at Fairweather’s.

Note the difference?

Celebrity artist Britney Drumheller

Save the date and time. 

August 5th, 5-7pm
Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway, Seaside, OR
Opening reception for FINDINGS

Britney Drumheller arrives with new art for 2017.

 

Opening reception for the exhibit “Findings,” which juxtaposes an array of art by Emily Miller, Mariana Mace, JoAnn Pari-Mueller and Chris Boyer about the pleasures of beach combing.

“Findings,” will be the 11th annual emerging artist exhibition in the  Fairweather Gallery and will include former emerging artists Britney Drumheller, Nick Brakel, Linda Trexler, Ashley Howarth, Diane Copenhaver,  Gayle H. Seely, Kristin Qian and Rebecca Gore.

Each of the artists in attendance will discuss the development of their work and the ideas that drive their creativity.

Seaside nature photographer, ecologist and biologist Neal Maine will speak at 6 p.m. Summertime beverages and light bites.

 

Britney Drumheller has a degree from the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles, but moved back to her hometown of Cannon Beach – she could not leave the beauty and inspiration of the beach behind. Her work functions as symbolic expressions relating to the value people attach to the North coastal tidelands and its marine life.

 

 

Artist statement:

Art has always been a part of me; in all of its forms, it enriches my life. After graduating from the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles, my career in fashion design focused on fashion illustration – until my Dad suggested I try to sell some beach-inspired art. I went to the beach, studied all of the creatures in the tide pools, and tried to put onto paper my discoveries.

 

My good friends suggested I bring my sketches to Fairweather House & Gallery in Seaside, and I was so pleased to be able to put my art in such a beautiful gallery.

My favorite media is to work with markers and colored pencils. The markers I use can give the allure of looking like watercolors, but can also give you crisp, clean lines. I enjoy working within the contrast of the freedom of watercolor and the preciseness of markers. Always sketching when I have a chance, I can get lost in a sketch for hours.

“Through my art, I hope to beautifully translate the sea life that I do so dearly love and honor.” the North coastal tidelands and its marine life.”

FUN FACT:

Fairweather’s launched Britney Drumheller in an emerging artist exhibition several years ago.

Q: Where in the world is Britney’s art today, you ask?

A:  Here, there and everywhere.

OREGON

Fairweather Gallery, Seaside OR

Found, Cannon Beach OR

Inn at Cannon Beach Cannon Beach OR

Purple Moon Boutique, Cannon Beach OR

The Ocean Spa, Cannon Beach, OR

Insomnia Coffee, Cannon Beach, OR

Re/max Reality, Cannon Beach & Manzanita OR

TerHars, Seaside & Cannon Beach OR

Ocean Lodge, Cannon Beach, OR

Cousins, Dalles OR

Cousins, Pasco OR

Red Hills Market, Dundee OR

Village Gifts, Yachats OR

Unique Store Grand Market Place, Portland OR

Marvels by the Sea, Florence OR

Bella, Baker City

Bella, La Grande

 

WASHINGTON

Alki Surf Shop, Seattle WA

Wild Seafood Market, Seattle WA

City Center Drug, Aberdeen WA

For the Love of Spice, Gig Harbor WA

Cotton & Cashmere, Bainbridge Island WA

Manitou Lodge Bed & Breakfast, Forks WA

 

HAWAII

Sandpeople, Moana Surfrider – Honolulu HI

Sandpeople, Sheraton Waikiki – Honolulu HI

Sandpeople, Ala Moana Mall – Honolulu HI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title: “Winged Wonder” by Neal Maine, PacificLight Images.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly. Location: Neacoxie Creek. Seaside/Gearhart.

Signed, matted and framed.

“Unless otherwise noted, images are presented as they were photographed. Slight adjustment by cropping, lightening or darkening may have been used, but the photo subject is presented as recorded in the Oregon coastal landscapes.”

A Certificate of Authenticity is provided with each copyrighted and signed image.

Available exclusively at Fairweather’s.

Proceeds to support North Coast Land Conservancy/NCLC.

 

 

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, rides on waves, water, timber, in habitat that used to belong to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD.Neal Maine

To read more about the photographer, please go to http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com/ …artists/ …Neal Maine

 

Save the date and time. 
Neal Maine, scientist and wildlife photographer to present a lecture on the ecology of the North Coast habitats.

August 5th, 6:pm
Fairweather House and Gallery
612 Broadway, Seaside, OR
Opening reception for FINDINGS

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk 

 

To read more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

Q: Where can the Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly be found, you ask?

A:  Habitat: Small ponds and slow streams. It perches on the tips of twigs, grasses and other vegetation.

Fun Creature Facts:

Distribution: Western U.S., West Indies and Central America south to Chile and Argentina.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly wings sit flat when perched and have a strong sustained flight; flitting about on gossamer wings and quiet as a whisper.

Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonflies are swift fliers, reminiscent of tiny airplanes.

Their eyes are huge, often meeting at the top of the head.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly, will eat almost any soft-bodied flying insect including mosquitoes, flies, small moths, mayflies, and flying ants or termites.

The Cardinal Meadowhawk dragonfly are aptly named as they mimic hawks, relentlessly pursuing their prey.

The Latin name for this genus, Sympetrum, means “with rock” and refers to their habit of basking on rocks to absorb heat early in the day.

This species is one of the first dragonflies to emerge each year.

imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/insects/drgnfly

 

 

 

By Renee’s Vintage Designs.

Signed Louis Vuitton.

Q: Who is Louis Vuitton, you ask?

A: Louis Vuitton is a fashion house and luxury retail company founded in 1854. The label’s LV monogram appears on most of its products, ranging from luxury trunks and leather goods, shoes, jewelry and accessories. Louis Vuitton is one of the world’s leading international fashion houses. For six consecutive years (2006–2012), Louis Vuitton was named the world’s most valuable luxury brand.

 

“Growing up, my grandmother would pull out her jewelry box, take each piece out one-by-one and explain in detail what it was, where it came from and why it was so special to her. This developed my love of antique and vintage jewelry. I started to think of how many treasured pieces are sitting in drawers and jewelry boxes, many handed down, some outdated, some broken and others, just put away because they didn’t match anything you wore. I decided enough of that! Let’s dig out those pieces and give them new life. As I design, I pray over my work that whoever wears this piece, may be blessed in some way. I thank God for blessing me with this creativity and passion.”–Renee Hafeman

 

 

 AUGUST 5th, 5-7:pm

FINDINGS opening reception 

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Fairweather House and Gallery

Renee Hafeman, jewelry designer, truly has found fabulous objects of desire, master pieces! Renee will be in attendance to discuss the development of her work and the ideas that drive her creativity. 

 

 

Exclusive signature jewelry available at Fairweather’s by Renee Vintage Designs.

 

Q: Who is Dolce & Gabbana, you ask?

A:  Dolce & Gabbana is an Italian luxury fashion house founded in 1985 by designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana. They won Perfume’s Academy “Most Feminine Flavor of the Year” in 1993 for their fragrance Dolce & Gabbana Parfum.

 

In addition FINDINGS will be the 11th (!) annual emerging artist exhibition! Fairweather’s will introduce current emerging artist Whelpsy Whelp.  

Fun fact: Fairweather has launched NW emerging artists Britney Drumheller, Nick Brakel, Linda Trexler, Ashley Howarth, Diane Copenhaver, Ashley Howarth, Gayle H. Seely, Kristin Qian and Rebecca Gore through the years. And, too, several of the talented artists will have new work for FINDINGS.  This is an event you do not want to miss!

FINDINGS will feature the juxtaposing an array of art from artists found at the recent BEAVER TALES ART SHOW and EXHIBITION in Seaside, as well.  New art by Emily Miller, Mariana Mace,  JoAnn Pari-Mueller and  Chris Boyer will be revealed, work created to depicting the pleasure of beach combing.

Seaside nature photographer, ecologist and biologist Neal Maine will speak at 6:pm. Summer time beverages and light bites.

Celebrating 13 years in 2017, Seaside First Saturday Art Walk is all about the arts.  Visitors meet artists, enjoy light bites, view artist demonstrations, see new work or enjoy live performances in music. The event is a free and held in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside. Complimentary parking is on the corner of Holladay and Oceanway.

 

To read more about the Art Walk, please go to http://www.facebook.com/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.