Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway, Seaside Oregon

Closed until it is safe to reopen.

Due to the  novel coronavirus the gallery shut its doors on March 15, 2020.

We hope make to it possible to enjoy some of what we have to offer to while you are at home in during the order to Stay at Home, Save Lives. Publishing articles is a way that we can continue to feature our resident artists during the situation,” chief curator Denise Fairweather.

 

 

Close up of Lysichiton americanus/ AKA Skunk Cabbage or Swamp Lantern  watercolor by Jo Pomeroy Crockett

Adored by many and ridiculed by some, Lysichiton americanus, aka skunk cabbage or swamp lantern is one of the first plants to emerge in late winter. Pushing its way through snow and peeking out of bogs, this bright yellow curvaceous “leaf” (spathe) with its inner structure of numerous small flowers (spadix) provides a warm resting and mating place for beetles and other insects. the calla lily. It has a distinctive fragrance similar to garlic or apples that give rise to its popular name.

Lysichton has many uses. Some Native peoples used it as an emergency food and a medicine. Hanis Coos elder Lottie Evanoff reportedly said she liked skunk cabbage very much and found it curious that settlers did not eat it. “Bears eats skunk cabbage, is just crazy for it. So, it must be good eating; everything bear eats is good eating.”  Jo Pomeroy Crockett, PhD/ artist

Jo Pomeroy Crockett

GATHER notes:

Importance of Quality Watercolor Paper

Watercolor, while not fussy is particular about the kind of paper it prefers. A special rough paper, handmade in India, with a very deep tooth is especially suited to this medium. Pigment just skims over the top but if given enough water, likes to settle into the valleys. Gentle glazes provide depth and effects not possible with other papers. The watercolors were painted on this special paper.  JPC

 

 

Jo Pomeroy Crockett, Phd., has often lectured at Fairweather’s.

Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, a North coast resident, works primarily wet-into-wet and strives for dramatic patterns. Vivid colors, an emphasis on the play of light and a touch of whimsy mark her paintings. Although she enjoys painting a variety of subjects, she especially enjoys painting nature. She has exhibited in numerous juried art competitions in the Southwest and the Pacific Northwest. Her work is in private collections in various parts of the United States, England, Canada and Switzerland. In combination with her art, she works as a free-lance writer and educator

 

 

“First Leap” by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images. Proceeds in support of NCLC.

 “This mallard chick seems to be enjoying life to the fullest as it scurries across a lily pad in a pond near my home.”  Neal Maine

After a thirty-year career as an award winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of North Coast Land Conservancy, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, a partnership with Michael Wing, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands and forests. Their photography centers around coastal and Columbia River landscape, ecology and the rich estuary habitat with the surrounding wetlands and forest systems.

 

Habitat lectures by Neal Maine at Fairweather’s will return when it is safe to re-open the gallery.

 

Artists and speakers were booked for the exhibition, GATHER,  several booked more than one year ago, with some of art delivered before the gallery closed mid-March.

The April exhibition, titled GATHER, which was meant to open in the gallery April 4 and run through April 25, was canceled  due to the novel coronavirus.

 

Elk in the dunes by Neal Maine/ PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

North Coast Land Conservancy/ reprint
Elk have been on the Oregon Coast a long, long, long, long time. Scientists believe elk migrated from Asia to North America over Beringia—better known as the Bering Land Bridge—some 120,000 years ago. The animals would have been a familiar sight to the first human hunters who migrated here tens of thousands of years later. Elk survived, and continue to survive, by being able to eat almost any kind of plant they can find, while we humans are limited to eating “soft fruits, a few easily digestible seeds, and the milk and flesh of our more versatile animal cousins,” as David Haskell writes in The Forest Unseen, one of naturalist and photographer Neal Maine’s favorite books.

 

 

Chasing the Light by Neal Maine/PacificLight Images.  Proceeds in support of NCLC.

We are all are holed up at home to slow the spread of the virus, hopefully,  this “Fairweather fix” will give moods and psyches a lift with some online R&R.

 

Watch time lapse video showing efforts in creating space for last year’s April exhibition, LIFE ABUNDANT.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhKYvSZM3bg

Soon, when it is safe to re-open, we will be back in the gallery.

Stay safe at home, save lives.

Fairweather House and Gallery will continue to reach out with on-line blog articles about the arts.

And, too, on a regular basis, during these uncertain times, we will continue to re-post previous LIVE  Fairweather arts events…until it is safe to re-open the gallery.

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

End note:

Flowers heal broken hearts.
https://youtu.be/ryUxrFUk6MY

“During this time of social distancing,  would you be willing to send images of the art being created in your studio during this crisis? ” 

 

“Wonderful idea. I have a few new pieces that I photographed just this evening.I hope this finds you well. Prospering would be nice, too, but that seems a bit out of reach for us these days.”

“You would think that I would be getting more done with all of this time on my hands… Well, I actually am, but it is all priority stuff queued up by circumstances beyond anyone’s control at the moment. That said, here are a couple of images for you to use. These are all pieces that are basically available, which is to say, at this writing, they are not on display in galleries or shows anywhere. The jewelry box been displayed recently, but it was made in January, so it is recent. The free form is still on the lathe, It will be done in a few days. For the time being I plan to leave the bark, moss, etc. on the piece.” Tom Willing

Sculptural free form work by Tom Willing.

 

Tom Willing designs that combine the aesthetic and functional with works that are sensitive to the interplay between light, form, and material.

 

 

Tom Willing’s work is elegantly finished on the lathe with walnut oil and beeswax, then buffed to bring out the natural luster of the wood.

“I seek to find the visual magic within the form of each piece of timber that is waiting to be revealed.”

 

Tom Willing holds his BA degree from the University of Oregon, an MA from Ohio State University, and an MAT from Lewis and Clark University. He taught middle school in Newberg, Oregon, until retiring in 2013.

Past President and Certified Member of the Pacific Northwest Woodturning Guild, he teaches woodturning techniques and is an active member of Northwest Woodturners and the American Association of Woodturners. He currently serves as President of Frogwood, A 501(c)(3) Arts Education Organization.

 

 

“Omnium-Gatherum”  by Barbara Martin  36×48 mixed media

“Created during the depths of winter, this painting is a loving incantation of everything floral — the first thrilling hints of springtime, the heady scent of roses, the glamour and mystery of a moonlit garden. With its many layers, the piece displays alluring depth and richness of color in an imaginative and impressionist style. Exciting color combinations and gestural movement bring high energy and a bold freshness to this beautiful painting. Mixed media: acrylic, charcoal, watercolor pencil, watercolor crayon on generously deep, gallery wrapped canvas.”

 

Barbara Martin is a contemporary painter known for high energy, gestural mark making and intuitive abstract works as well as for her “Super Ply” series of surreal creatures painted in black and white. Her award winning work has been exhibited nationally. Recent achievements include residencies awarded by Jentel Foundation for the Arts, Brush Creek Foundation for the Arts, and Hypatia-in-the-Woods and significant grants from the Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts and Culture Commission.

 

“I have enclosed a couple of photos of a piece I am currently working on.  The photos of this in process piece are taken from a couple of angles showing my work space. Stay safe and healthy.”  Diane Copenhaver
Diane Copenhaver attempts to immortalize the power of art. With that art has the power to transform, heal, progress and enrich.

She recently embarked on a journey of discovery to unleash her creative talents after a career in business with a major northwest aerospace company.

Diane is painting primarily abstract using acrylics on varied surfaces. She also produces collage and mixed media works, is studying calligraphic arts and has begun to explore encaustic painting.

Color and texture are often the focus of Diane’s paintings. She uses layers of paint, as well as a variety of mediums to create texture. Color is selected to express a message, demonstrate beauty, or create energy. Brushes, palette knives, and scrapers are used and she often applies paint then wipes it away. Diane’s work is spontaneous and she is encouraged to let go of the precious and just let the paint flow.

 

Art Saves exhibit at Fairweather House and Gallery.

“Artists have a unique sensitivity in the ability to pivot and meet with needs that enlighten, inform, and insprie.”  D. Fairweather, galleriest.

 

To read more about the artists, please visit http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 March 15, 2020:

In order to protect the health and safety our guests, our community, and our staff the Gallery is closing its doors and will re-open only when it is safe to do so.

 

 

 

“Create” folded book art by Mary Bottita

“Read” folded book art by Mary Bottita

 

Sketching and pondering from Karen Doyle

 

Turtle by Paul Brent. C/. 2020

 

Seahorse by Paul Brent. C./ 2020 By

 

Ghost net basket turning inward by Emily Miller C./ 2020

Ghost net basket series. Spring 2020 by Emily Miller

“I’m also working on a wall piece with about 1,000 tiny chips of plastic. The title of the piece is Anthropocene and it’s inspired by the idea that our human impact on the earth has become so significant that it will be written in the fossil record.”  Emily Miller

Reposting  Fairweather Gallery March 15, 2020:

In order to protect the health and safety our guests, our community, and our staff the Gallery is closing its doors to visitors through April.

 

“Artists and those that support the arts have a unique sensitivity in the ability to pivot and meet needs that enlighten and inform, in my opinion.”  D. Fairweather, galleriest

Artist Mike Mason in his studio.

In order to protect the health and safety our guests, our community, and our staff (who are over the age of 65 and are deemed to be a high health risk), the Gallery is closing its doors to visitors through April.

“This decision comes after careful review of guidance from public health authorities and projections for the spread of COVID-19, and reflects our desire to ensure it is not contributing to transmission of the disease which could overwhelm our health care system. This is a difficult decision, but we are confident is the right choice.”

Please re-visit our previously published blog post articles throughout this time.

Questions or concerns, please email fairweatherkd@gmail.com.

Thank you for your understanding.

 

March 14, 2019 Question to the Fairweather artists.

Q: “Here is an idea. Please send images of the art being created in your studio during this crisis. We will publish  a blog post and keep it updated as you share with us what you are creating. Are you interested? Let me know your thoughts.”

 

 

“Wonderful idea! Here is a couple of teaser photos of what I have been working,”  woodworker Mike Brown

 

“I am painting in my art studio.” Toni Avery

 

“Social distancing doesn’t require you to become a shut-in. I go outside to paint,”  en plein arist Emily Miller.

 

“In addition, I’m finishing up a few smaller baskets for a large collaborative display of reclaimed fishing rope ( ghost net collected by Cape Lookeout rangers).basket sculptures called Undersea Garden.”  Emily Miller

 

“I like this idea! You can use this one and will try to send a few more. Thanks for the up date about the gallery,” artist/ Professor Emeritus of Art Pacific University Jan Shield.

 

 

“It is my plan to create tomorrow, I would love to send some pictures while I am creating! I have been wondering how things will go with all of this virus worry.  If there is anything I can do to be of help, please don’t hesitate to ask.”  Rene’e Hafeman, jewelry designer.

 

“Here is an image of a book I just published in early 2020 on a series Weekend Projects  I tried to provide day-by-day instructions different projects which use one common element: stringers. Thanks for the proposal. I think it’s very useful to have a venue that helps especially during the crisis. I’m working now on a couple of new big works and will share photos as soon as I have them completed,”  fused glass artist Fyodor Zubanov.

 

“I have scheduled kids art on-line classes (ages 8-18) all week in three different time zones: Central Europe / US East Coast / and US West Coast time. We are learning how to draw puffins!”   Leah Kohlenberg www.leahkohlenberg.com/book-online

 

 

“Hope everyone is staying healthy! I’m staying home painting.” Pam Haunschild

“This strange virus has affected everyone.  We are 3 weeks behind the Italians infections so things are going to get way more interesting.  I appreciate the information and understand if other schedules need to be altered.  Thank you for keeping me updated. Stay safe!” Jan Rimerman, Artist/Art Administrator.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has  issued guidelines for “community mitigation strategies” to limit the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, which include recommendations for “social distancing”—a term that epidemiologists are using to refer to a conscious effort to reduce close contact between people and hopefully stymie community transmission of the virus.

 

 

  • Be in nature. Breathe fresh air. Notice things about the world around you that you didn’t see before.
  • Start birdwatching. Coronavirus hasn’t bothered the birds. Find out what species nest near you, dust off your binoculars if you’ve got ’em and download a birdwatching map.
  • Make art. Whether it’s a page out of a coloring book or paint-by-numbers masterpiece, a knitted scarf or a piece of pottery, creating will ease your mind and keep your fingers nimble.

 

 

“Thank you with the list of things to do.  It’s one of the most uplifting ones I’ve received,” artist Sandy Visse

 

Please visit us on line at www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.co

Eve Marx Just in from CA: Gov. Gavin Newsom on Sunday called for home isolation of all seniors and those who are health compromised in the state of California and the immediate shutdown of bars, nightclubs, brew pubs and wineries to help stop the spread of coronavirus, now considered a global pandemic.

In addition, Newsom said all restaurants should reduce capacity by half and provide “deep social distancing.”

 

Jan and Jay Barber, Mayor of Seaside, introducing wildlife photographer Neal Maine.

 

Neal Maine presenting a signed ArcticLight photograph to Nancy Holmes, lucky raffle winner.

 

Karen Doyle, Fresh Start featured artist,  with Saundra, Art Walk hostess, lecturing about her art painted for the exhibition.

 

Dorota Haber-Lehigh, Fresh Start featured artist, with Joan, Art Walk hostess, lecturing about her art created for the exhibition.

 

Gayle H. Seely, Fresh Start featured artist, with Kathy, Art Walk hostess, lecturing about her art created for the exhibition.

Neal Maine,  Seaside/ Gearhart naturalist, lectured about the new and fresh frames for a series of juvenile eagle images captured in the local habitat.

 

A poised and composed Shirley 88  caught in a pause from playing LIVE during the evening affair.

 

Fresh tidbits: grapes, pineapples, jelly cookies, sugar wafers, sponge cake, kisses, chocolate mints and sugar cookies. Thanks to K. Bowman, Fairweather’s Director of Hospitality.

 

Revealing a fresh take on Neal Maine’s famous “Elk Run” photo.  Custom order in a 38×48 size finished through a lot of collaboration with a fellow gallery owner from Necanicum Gallery. Indeed, the project involved more than four people  working together to complete the goal of enlarging an iconic image from the local habitat.  This image by Neal Maine, nature photographer, was published in the May-June 2015 issue of Bugle magazine (published by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation). It is pictured in the story printed on page 62 about Gearhart, OR; which is #6 on the list of top ten “elkiest” places in America. The article is titled: Greetings from Elk City USA, pages 56-68. Neal Maine, a former educator,  devotes his time to observing the local wildlife and raising habitat awareness.

 

Fresh Start Exhibition and Sale

Through March 25

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, OR  97138

“This exhibit’s  expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way. Indeed, the meaning of “fresh start” is: the beginning of a new period or step,”   D. Fairweather, gallerist.

http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Photos by Kemy Kay Kjemhus.

Original watercolor by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett, handmade spring column candles, mouthblown glass, hand turned wood candle sticks, pottery by Suzy Holland, mouth blown stemware by Rox Heath, vintage bird feeder and bird house, silk and chenille throw pillows.

Pastel by Gretha Lindwood, pair of whimsical artworks by Marga Stanley, mouth blown art glass, hand made potter vase, hand wired silk iris stem, hand beeded flowers, contemporary floral by Jo Pomeroy-Crockett and art cards by Leah Kohlenberg, glassware by Robin and Rox Heath.

Art by Toni Avery, handmade tea pot by Kate Carlye, hand-forged candle sticks, fused glass by Carolyn Lindberg and mouth blown art vase

Pottery by Suzy Holland and oil painting by Carmela Newstead.

Art by Leah Kohlenberg, textile art by Linda Olson..

Handmade birdie pillow by Cherry Jones Harris, feather motif handmade journal by Christine Trexel, mouth blown art glass, pottery and platters hand made by Maria Hudson.

Handmade glass by Bob Heath.

Handmade glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

 

 

Handmade glass by Christine Downs, fused glass by Sandy and Bob Lercari, urchin rocks by Kandy Schwartz, and ocean oil by Sandy and Bob Lercari.

Outdoor garden **folly filled with  cattail dyed green spheres and handmade moss decorative moss spheres.

 

**Q:  What is a garden folly, you ask?

A: A garden folly is usually considered a building or structure that is designed for decoration with no other purpose than to add a touch of whimsy or extravagance to the surrounding landscape. The term began as “a name for any costly structure considered to have shown folly in the builder” and was often named after the individual who commissioned or designed the project. The connotations of silliness or madness in this definition are in accord with the general meaning of the French word “folie”; however, another older meaning of this word is “delight.”

Photos by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall.

 

“This exhibit’s expectation lies in its possibility to present fresh, new perspectives, inspiration, experiences, reflection and even the possibility for transcendence in some way. Indeed, the meaning of “fresh start” is the beginning of a new period or step.  The North Coast land, truly, is in full springtime bloom for FRESH START, Fairweather’s March exhibition.”

“Portal” side one by seed mosaic for spring 2020 by Gayle H. Seely

“Portal” side two by Gayle H. Seely

Q:  What is the definition of portal, you ask?

A:  A portal is a gate or doorway. Portal can be used to describe other types of doorways, both literal and metaphorical.  If you enjoy reading science fiction or fantasy, you may be familiar with the use of the word portal to mean “a doorway to another world.” The wardrobe in C.S. Lewis’s The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe functions as a portal to the land of Narnia.

“Running Water” seed pearl mosaic box by Gayle H. Seely.

“I like to combine a theme of an exhibit  with the subject “water” to create distinctive pieces that are tactile as well as visual,” Gayle H. Seely.

“I love seeing people become so involved in my boxes, Gayle H. Seely.

 

“I layer tiny beads and stones in painterly combinations onto small wooden boxes,” Gayle H. Seely.

Fairweather House and Gallery art display of Gayle H. Seely.

 

In 2019 Gayle H. Seely was selected as a Fairweather Gallery resident artist, having previously served as an emerging artist to watch.  2020 marks her sixth year in the gallery.

 

 

“The portal piece for FRESH START began with two earrings made of abalone. A circle from my Mom balanced on a tall triangle that was mine. It immediately reminded me of a keyhole and drew me to the idea of peeking through a portal to see what comes next. The black edges bring to mind a path through the liminal space between the two bigger sides shining colorfully and shimmering with the changing light source.” Gayle H. Seely

“Gayle H. Seely’s ancient methods of mosaic and beading combined with fresh, modern energy and emotions create intricate colorful boxes, bound to delight,”  wrote  Eve Marx, reporter for The Astorian.

Read more at http://www.fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

 

Read more about the artist:

 

The art of Gayle H. Seely | News | dailyastorian.comwww.dailyastorian.com › archives › signal › the-art-of-gayle-h-seely

Feb 16, 2018 – By EVE MARX. “I love seeing people become so involved in my boxes,” Gayle H. Seely said. The artist’s unique creations will be on display at …

 

Fun facts:

Gayle’s father was one of the co-founders of NCLC with Neal Maine.

Al Vernon, retired banker and father to the artist, posed for a photo during a recent Gayle H. Seely reception.

D. Fairweather’s uncle  “Dr. Ed” delivered the Vernon children.

 

 

Grace note received:

“Thank you very much for all your hard work and support. You have gathered such a wonderful group of artists with a wide variety of skills and ideas.     I am proud to show my work at Fairweather’s.”  Gayle H. Seely